Commands by abcde (10)

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Mount a temporary ram partition
Makes a partition in ram which is useful if you need a temporary working space as read/write access is fast. Be aware that anything saved in this partition will be gone after your computer is turned off.

Test python regular expressions
One can test their python regex matching using this shell function. for e.g. $ rgx_match "translate\s*\(([0-9-.]+),([0-9-.]+)\)" "translate(162.11517,76.817357)" ('162.11517', '76.817357')

Find pages returning 404 errors in apache logs
Finds the top ten pages returning an http response code of 404 in an apache log.

Get the Last tweet (Better than Twitter feed rrs)
I was using some twitter bots and twitter bloks my IP. Now im using some proxys and i use these command to validate the tweet was published.

Copy ssh keys to user@host to enable password-less ssh logins.
Same as original just no $ at start

Insert commas to make reading numbers easier in the output of ls
This modifies the output of ls so that the file size has commas every three digits. It makes room for the commas by destructively eating any characters to the left of the size, which is probably okay since that's just the "group".   Note that I did not write this, I merely cleaned it up and shortened it with extended regular expressions. The original shell script, entitled "sl", came with this description:    : '  : For tired eyes (sigh), do an ls -lF plus whatever other flags you give  : but expand the file size with commas every 3 digits. Really helps me  : distinguish megabytes from hundreds of kbytes...  :  : Corey Satten, corey@cac.washington.edu, 11/8/89  : '   Of course, some may suggest that fancy new "human friendly" options, like "ls -Shrl", have made Corey's script obsolete. They are probably right. Yet, at times, still I find it handy. The new-fangled "human-readable" numbers can be annoying when I have to glance at the letter at the end to figure out what order of magnitude is even being talked about. (There's a big difference between 386M and 386P!). But with this nifty script, the number itself acts like a histogram, a quick visual indicator of "bigness" for tired eyes. :-)

List all databases in Postgres and their (byte/human) sizes, ordering by byte size descending
Get a listing of all of your databases in Postgres and their sizes, ordering by the largest size first. Requires that you give the -d parameter a valid database name that you can connect to.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

for x in `psql -e\l | awk '{print $1}'| egrep -v "(^List|^Name|\-\-\-\-\-|^\()"`; do pg_dump -C $x | gzip > /backups/$x-back.gz
Ran as the postgres user, dumps each database individually. It dumps with the create statements as well, so you can just 'zcat $x-nightly.dmp.gz | psql' to reimport/recreate a database from a backup.

List files older than one year, exluding those in the .snapshot directory
Useful when you want to cron a daily deletion task in order to keep files not older than one year. The command excludes .snapshot directory to prevent backup deletion. One can append -delete to this command to delete the files : $ find /path/to/directory -not \( -name .snapshot -prune \) -type f -mtime +365 -delete


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