Commands using find (1,228)

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Prints total line count contribution per user for an SVN repository
make usable on OSX with filenames containing spaces. note: will still break if filenames contain newlines... possible, but who does that?!

Replace duplicate files by hardlinks

Displays the attempted user name, ip address, and time of SSH failed logins on Debian machines
A variation of a script I found on this site and then slimmed down to just use awk. It displays all users who have attempted to login to the box and failed using SSH. Pipe it to the sort command to see which usernames have the most failed logins.

Find out how old a web page is
I used to use the Firefox "View page info" feature a lot to determine how stale the web page I was looking at was. Now that I use mostly Chrome I miss that feature, so here is a command line alternative using wget. The -S says to display the server response, the --spider says to not download any files/pages, just fetch the header. The output goes to stderr, so to grep it you use 2>&1 to combine the stderr stream with stdout, the pipe that to grep for Last-Modified. You can use curl instead if you have it installed, like this: $ curl --head -s http://osswin.sourceforge.net | grep Mod

Rename files in batch

Expand shortened URLs
curl(1) is more portable than wget(1) across Unices, so here is an alternative doing the same thing with greater portability. This shell function uses curl(1) to show what site a shortened URL is pointing to, even if there are many nested shortened URLs. This is a great way to test whether or not the shortened URL is sending you to a malicious site, or somewhere nasty that you don't want to visit. The sample output is from: $ expandurl http://t.co/LDWqmtDM

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Lock the hardware eject button of the cdrom
This command will lock the hardware eject button of your cdrom drive. Some uses are: 1: If you have a toddler and has discovered the cdrom button 2: If you are carrying a laptop in a bag or case and don't want it to eject if the button is inadvertently pressed. To unlock the button use: $ eject -i 0

Delete C style comments using vim

Clone /
Clone linux installation.


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