Commands by SlimG (4)

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Display kernel profile of currently executing functions in Solaris.
Lockstat will sample the kernel 977 times per second, and print out the functions that it sees executing on the CPU during the sample. The -s 10 switch tells lockstsat to not only print that function, but also show the call stack (up to 10 deep).

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Make redirects to localhost via /etc/hosts more interesting
Normally when a site is blocked through /etc/hosts, traffic is just being redirected to a non-existent server that isn't going to respond. This helps get your point across a little more clearly than a browser timeout. Of course you could use any number of codes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_HTTP_status_codes Obviously, this command can be added to init-rc.d, and more sophisticated responses can be given. Seems noteworthy to mention that the information sent from the browser can be parsed using the bash READ builtin (such as 'while read -t 1 statement; do parsing'), and the connection stays open until the script exits. Take care that you must use EXEC:'bash -c foo.sh', as 'execvp' (socat's method for executing scripts) invokes 'sh', not 'bash'.

tar a directory and send it to netcat
tar's directory and sends to netcat listening on port 10000 On the client end: netcat [server ip] 10000 | tar xfvz - This will send it over the network and extract it on the clients machine.

Randomize lines (opposite of | sort)
Randomizes a file. The opposite of sort is sort -R!

back ssh from firewalled hosts
host B (you) redirects a modem port (62220) to his local ssh. host A is a remote machine (the ones that issues the ssh cmd). once connected port 5497 is in listening mode on host B. host B just do a ssh 127.0.0.1 -p 5497 -l user and reaches the remote host'ssh. This can be used also for vnc and so on.

Go to the Nth line of file [text editor]
This is not printing, real editing using the text editor.

share internet connection with only one network interface
the below command create a alias for share your internet connection with another. $ifconfig eth0:1 192.168.0.1/24 Its obviously necessary too activate the iptables post-routing and ip forwarding, as root: $modprobe iptable_nat $iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE $echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward Be sure that the alias 192.168.0.0/24 is not your active real ip range

Do some learning...
I like it sorted... 2> /dev/null was also needless, since our pipes already select stdin, only.

Nginx - print all optional modules before compilation
wget http://nginx.org/download/nginx-1.15.3.tar.gz && tar -xzf 1.15.3.tar.gz && cd nginx-1.15.3


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