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View webcam output using GStreamer pipeline
Open a window that displays camera capture. Framerate, width and height may be changed to match your needs.

Do some learning...
I like it sorted... 2> /dev/null was also needless, since our pipes already select stdin, only.

View all date formats, Quick Reference Help Alias
If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command. # creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com $ ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date +git-$USER@$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C 'webmaster@askapache.com' $ # /home/gpl/.ssh/git-gplnet@askapache.github.com-04-22-10 # create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory $ tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g'

Run a command only when load average is below a certain threshold
Good for one off jobs that you want to run at a quiet time. The default threshold is a load average of 0.8 but this can be set using atrun.

Lock the hardware eject button of the cdrom
This command will lock the hardware eject button of your cdrom drive. Some uses are: 1: If you have a toddler and has discovered the cdrom button 2: If you are carrying a laptop in a bag or case and don't want it to eject if the button is inadvertently pressed. To unlock the button use: $ eject -i 0

search office documents for credit card numbers and social security number SSN docx xlsx
# CC with SSN dash ( low false positive only match ###-##-#### not any 8digi number ) $ find . -iname "*.???x" -type f -exec unzip -p '{}' '*' \; | sed -e 's/]\{1,\}>/ /g; s/[^[:print:]]\{1,\}/ /g' | egrep "\b4[0-9]{12}(?:[0-9]{3})?\b|\b5[1-5][0-9]{14}\b|\b6011[0-9]{14}\b|\b3(?:0[0-5]\b|\b[68][0-9])[0-9]{11}\b|\b3[47][0-9]{13}\b|\b[0-9]{3}-[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{4}\b" $ rmccurdyDOTcom

Execute a command without saving it in the history
Prepending one or more spaces to your command won't be saved in history. Useful for pr0n or passwords on the commandline. Tested on BASH.

show git commit history

ssh autocomplete
Add to your bash profile to minimize carpal tunnel syndrome. Doesn't work with user@hostname but appending "-l user" works fine if needed. Works for ping as well.. complete -W "$(echo `cat ~/.ssh/known_hosts | cut -f 1 -d ' ' | sed -e s/,.*//g | uniq | grep -v "\["`;)" ping

Match a URL
For the record: I didn't build this. Just shared what I found that worked. Apologies to the original author! I decided I should fix the case where http://example.com is not matched for the next time I need this. So I read rfc1035 and formalized the host name regex. If anyone finds any more holes, please comment.


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