Commands by 6bc98f7f (6)

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floating point operations in shell scripts
Calculator for shell. Similar performance and basic usage as 'bc', but with more advanced features. Not installed on most systems by default.

Convert DOS newlines (CR/LF) to Unix format
Convert DOS newlines (CR/LF) to Unix format using sed command

Remove orphaned dependencies on Arch
-Qdt Lists dependencies/packages which are no longer required by any packages -q Output only package name (not the version number) -R Remove package(s) Rest is self-explanatory. I just started out with Arch - so if there is any better/standard method to achieve the same - please suggest.

Make .bashrc function to backup the data you changed last houres
The original overwrites any previous backups, and only saves exactly the last hours worth, but not 1 hour + 1 minute. This version creates or appends files, and backs up everything since the last backup (using the backups timestamp as the reference), plus it uses TMPDIR if set.

Remove security limitations from PDF documents using ghostscript (for Windows)
#4345 also works under windows

Find all dot files and directories

shows history of logins on the server
outputs a history of logins on the server (top 10, when piped to 'head'); optional flags: '-a' put the hostname at the end of the line (good for long hostnames), '-i' post the IP instead of the hostname, '-F' put the full login and logout times, rather than short times.

remove files and directories with acces time older than a given date
touch a dummy file with the specified date, then use find with -anewer .

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

grep tab chars
mixing tabs and spaces for indentation in python would confuse the python interpreter, to avoid that, check if the file has any tab based indentation. "^V" => denotes press control + v and press tab within quotes. $ cat improper_indent.py class Tux(object): print "Hello world.." $ grep " " improper_indent.py print "Hello world.."


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