Commands using column (54)

  • Particularly useful if you're mounting different drives, using the following command will allow you to see all the filesystems currently mounted on your computer and their respective specs with the added benefit of nice formatting. Show Sample Output


    313
    mount | column -t
    thechile · 2009-03-20 14:18:56 8
  • -n switch keeps empty columns If your distribution does not ship with a recent column version that supports -n you can use this alternative: perl -pe 's/(^|;);/$1 ;/g' file.csv | column -ts\; | less -S Change the delimiter to your liking.


    23
    column -tns: /etc/passwd
    bashrc · 2011-08-31 10:47:04 0
  • If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command. # creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date [email protected]$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C '[email protected]' # /home/gpl/.ssh/[email protected] # create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g' <<< $PWD`.tgz) . # tar -czf /home/gpl/.backups/04-22-10-01:13-#home#gpl#.rr#src.tgz . I personally find myself having to reference date --help quite a bit as a result. So this nice alias saves me a lot of time. This is one bdash mofo. Works in sh and bash (posix), but will likely need to be changed for other shells due to the parameter substitution going on.. Just extend the sed command, I prefer sed to pretty much everything anyways.. but it's always preferable to put in the extra effort to go for as much builtin use as you can. Otherwise it's not a top one-liner, it's a lazyboy recliner. Here's the old version: alias dateh='date --help|sed "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/!d;s/ \+/ /g"|while read l;do date "+ %${l/% */}_${l/% */}_${l#* }";done|column -s_ -t' This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ] Show Sample Output


    21
    alias dateh='date --help|sed -n "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/p"|while read l;do F=${l/% */}; date +%$F:"|'"'"'${F//%n/ }'"'"'|${l#* }";done|sed "s/\ *|\ */|/g" |column -s "|" -t'
    AskApache · 2010-04-21 01:22:18 5
  • -P uses the POSIX output format, which makes information on each file system always printed on exactly one line. "column -t" makes a table from the input. Show Sample Output


    20
    df -P | column -t
    6bc98f7f · 2011-04-09 13:12:46 5
  • Splits the input based on commas and prints it in a nice column format. This would not work for CSV rows that have "," between quotes or with newline characters. Use only simple simple csv files. Show Sample Output


    18
    column -s, -t <tmp.csv
    pykler · 2009-09-24 20:57:32 0
  • since fuse mounts do not appear in /etc/mtab (fuse can't write there, dunno if it would if it could) this is propably a better way.


    10
    column -t /proc/mounts
    unixmonkey5049 · 2009-08-09 17:00:41 2
  • I like the other three versions but one uses nested loops and another prints every color on a separate line. Both versions fail to reset colors before giving the prompt back. This version uses the column command to print a table so all the colors fit on one screen. It also resets colors back to normal before as a last step.


    9
    for i in {0..255}; do echo -e "\e[38;05;${i}m${i}"; done | column -c 80 -s ' '; echo -e "\e[m"
    cout · 2010-07-21 17:30:36 1
  • The -W switch of netstat makes it print complete URL of the connections, which otherwise by default is truncated to fit its default column size. Now to compensate for irregular column sizes, pipe the output to column (-t switch of column prints in tabular form). The only downside to this part is that the very first row, the header, goes pear shape. Show Sample Output


    6
    netstat -tup -W | column -t
    b_t · 2014-01-08 22:39:01 0
  • Prints out an ascii chart using builtin bash! Then formats using cat -t and column. The best part is: echo -e "${p: -3} \\0$(( $i/64*100 + $i%64/8*10 + $i%8 ))"; From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/ascii-codes-and-reference.html Show Sample Output


    6
    for i in {1..256};do p=" $i";echo -e "${p: -3} \\0$(($i/64*100+$i%64/8*10+$i%8))";done|cat -t|column -c120
    AskApache · 2014-04-04 16:54:53 3
  • ifconfig can't properly display interface's name longer 9 symbols,also it can't show IPs added thru ip command, so 'ip' should be used instead. This alias properly shows long names, bond interfaces and all interface aliases. loopback interface is ignored, since its IP is obvious Show Sample Output


    5
    alias ips='ip a | awk '\''/inet /&&!/ lo/{print $NF,$2}'\'' | column -t'
    zolden · 2010-03-06 20:33:04 0

  • 5
    nmap -sn 192.168.1.0/24 -oG - | awk '$4=="Status:" && $5=="Up" {print $0}'|column -t
    wuziduzi · 2019-04-19 17:12:00 0
  • This one-liner will output installed packages sorted by size in Kilobytes. Show Sample Output


    4
    paste <(pacman -Q | awk '{ print $1; }' | xargs pacman -Qi | grep 'Size' | awk '{ print $4$5; }') <(pacman -Q | awk '{print $1; }') | sort -n | column -t
    BruceLEET · 2011-01-07 18:43:18 0
  • The multiplication table for math study Show Sample Output


    4
    for y in {1..10}; do for x in {1..10}; do echo -n "| $x*$y=$((y*x)) "; done; echo; done|column -t
    lpalgarvio · 2016-09-07 12:31:18 0
  • Using column to format a directory listing Show Sample Output


    3
    (printf "PERMISSIONS LINKS OWNER GROUP SIZE MONTH DAY HH:MM PROG-NAME\n" \ ; ls -l | sed 1d) | column -t
    opexxx · 2009-10-08 11:53:38 1
  • Prints a log of phonecalls placed from/to an asterisk server, formated into an easily readable table. You can use partial number/queue matches, or use .* to match everything. Show Sample Output


    3
    phonelogs() { grep "$1" /var/log/asterisk/cdr-csv/Master.csv | cut -d',' -f 2,3,11,12 --output-delimiter=" " | sed 's/"//g' | cut -d' ' -f 1,2,3,4,6 | column -t; }
    SuperJediWombat · 2010-03-28 08:30:46 0
  • Once you get into advanced/optimized scripts, functions, or cli usage, you will use the sort command alot. The options are difficult to master/memorize however, and when you use sort commands as much as I do (some examples below), it's useful to have the help available with a simple alias. I love this alias as I never seem to remember all the options for sort, and I use sort like crazy (much better than uniq for example). # Sorts by file permissions find . -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %p\n' | sort -k1 -r -g -bS 20% 00761 drwxrw---x ./tmp 00755 drwxr-xr-x . 00701 drwx-----x ./askapache-m 00644 -rw-r--r-- ./.htaccess # Shows uniq history fast history 1000 | sed 's/^[0-9 ]*//' | sort -fubdS 50% exec bash -lxv export TERM=putty-256color Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    alias sorth='sort --help|sed -n "/^ *-[^-]/s/^ *\(-[^ ]* -[^ ]*\) *\(.*\)/\1:\2/p"|column -ts":"'
    AskApache · 2010-06-10 21:30:31 0
  • This shows every bit of information that stat can get for any file, dir, fifo, etc. It's great because it also shows the format and explains it for each format option. If you just want stat help, create this handy alias 'stath' to display all format options with explanations. alias stath="stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'" To display on 2 lines: ( F=/etc/screenrc N=c IFS=$'\n'; for L in $(sed 's/%Z./%Z\n/'<<<`stat --h|sed -n '/^ *%/s/^ *%\(.\).*$/\1:%\1/p'`); do G=$(echo "stat -$N '$L' \"$F\""); eval $G; N=fc;done; ) For a similarly powerful stat-like function optimized for pretty output (and can sort by any field), check out the "lll" function http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5815/advanced-ls-output-using-find-for-formattedsortable-file-stat-info From my .bash_profile -> http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    statt(){ C=c;stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'|while read l;do p=${l/% */};[ $p == %Z ]&&C=fc&&echo ^FS:^;echo "`stat -$C $p \"$1\"` ^$p^${l#%* }";done|column -ts^; }
    AskApache · 2010-06-11 23:31:03 0
  • Just an alternative with more advanced formating for readability purpose. It now uses colors (too much for me but it's a kind of proof-of-concept), and adjust columns. Show Sample Output


    3
    curl -u username --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | awk 'BEGIN{FS="\n";RS="(</entry>\n)?<entry>"}NR!=1{print "\033[1;31m"$9"\033[0;32m ("$10")\033[0m:\t\033[1;33m"$2"\033[0m"}' | sed -e 's,<[^>]*>,,g' | column -t -s $'\t'
    frntn · 2011-10-15 23:15:52 0
  • Spits out table that shows your Host->HostName aliases in ~/.ssh/config


    3
    awk '$1=="Host"{$1="";H=substr($0,2)};$1=="HostName"{print H,"$",$2}' ~/.ssh/config | column -s '$' -t
    wejn · 2014-05-24 20:51:47 0
  • This command could seem pretty pointless especially when you can get the same result more easily using the rpm builtin queryformat, like: rpm -qa --qf "%{NAME} %{VERSION} %{RELEASE}.%{ARCH}\n" | sort | column -t but nonetheless I've learned that sometimes it can be quite interesting trying to explore alternative ways to accomplish the same task (as Perl folks like to say: There's more than one way to do it!) Show Sample Output


    3
    rpm -qa | sed 's/^\(.*\)-\([^-]\{1,\}\)-\([^-]\{1,\}\)$/\1 \2 \3/' | sort | column -t
    acavagni · 2019-03-14 21:11:45 0

  • 2
    df -PH|column -t
    bakhru · 2011-04-13 21:13:14 0

  • 2
    cat /etc/passwd | column -nts:
    kev · 2011-08-31 02:08:20 3
  • This takes all of the tab spaces, and uses column to put them into the appropriately sized table. Show Sample Output


    2
    netstat -pnut -W | column -t -s $'\t'
    Nadiar · 2014-05-03 00:48:53 0

  • 2
    ps axo pcpu,args | awk '/[p]hp.*pool/ { sums[$4] += $1 } END { for (pool in sums) { print sums[pool], pool } }' | sort -rn | column -t
    phunehehe · 2014-12-11 05:31:04 2

  • 1
    /sbin/ip -f inet addr | sed -rn 's/.*inet ([^ ]+).*(eth[[:digit:]]*(:[[:digit:]]+)?)/\2 \1/p' | column -t
    owen · 2009-12-17 19:48:28 0
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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Rename files in batch

Run a command if file/directory changes
Example: $ runonchange /etc/nginx nginx -t Ignores vim temp files. Depends on 'inotify-tools' for monitoring of file changes. Alternative to tools like 'entr', 'watchr'.

Pretty man pages under X
You're a developer - but it doesn't mean you have to slum it! Why not spice up your man page lookups by using a decent PDF viewer. I use 'xpdf' - maybe you prefer acroread, whatever, it's just as fast as plain dull ASCII on today's machines and you can still search for stuff - that's the main reason I use PDF and not PS.

bash script to zip a folder while ignoring git files and copying it to dropbox
Better tool for exporting git's repository is Git itself!

Summarize Apache Extended server-status to show longest running requests
Ever need to know why Apache is bogging down *right now*? Hate scanning Apache's Extended server-status for the longest running requests? Me, too. That's why I use this one liner to quickly find suspect web scripts that might need review. Assuming the Extended server-status is reachable at the target URL desired, this one-liner parses the output through elinks (rendering the HTML) and shows a list of active requests sorted by longest running request at the bottom of the list. I include the following fields (as noted in the header line): Seconds: How long the request is alive PID: Process ID of the request handler State: State of the request, limited to what I think are the relevant ones (GCRK_.) IP: Remote Host IP making the request Domain: Virtual Host target (HTTP/1.1 Host: header). Important for Virtual Hosting servers TYPE: HTTP verb URL: requested URL being served. Putting this in a script that runs when triggered by high load average can be quite revealing. Can also capture "forgotten" scripts being exploited such as "formmail.pl", etc.

full memcache client in under 255 chars (uses dd, sed and nc)
usage: mem memcache-command [arguments] where memcache-command might be: set add get[s] append prepend replace delete incr decr cas stats verbosity version notes: exptime argument is set to 0 (no expire) flags argument is set to 1 (arbitrary)


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