Commands tagged ls (117)

  • ... plus do a sort according frequency Show Sample Output


    11
    find . -type f | awk -F'.' '{print $NF}' | sort| uniq -c | sort -g
    cp · 2011-02-14 09:15:29 0
  • This command will find the biggest files recursively under a certain directory, no matter if they are too many. If you try the regular commands ("find -type f -exec ls -laSr {} +" or "find -type f -print0 | xargs -0 ls -laSr") the sorting won't be correct because of command line arguments limit. This command won't use command line arguments to sort the files and will display the sorted list correctly. Show Sample Output


    10
    find . -type f -printf '%20s %p\n' | sort -n | cut -b22- | tr '\n' '\000' | xargs -0 ls -laSr
    fsilveira · 2009-08-13 13:13:33 5
  • List all commands present on system by folder. PATH contains all command folder separated by ':'. With ${PATH//:/ }, we change ':' in space and create a list of folder for ls command. Show Sample Output


    9
    ls ${PATH//:/ }
    Zulu · 2012-04-26 19:45:52 4
  • I love this function because it tells me everything I want to know about files, more than stat, more than ls. It's very useful and infinitely expandable. find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' | sort -rgbS 50% 00761 drwxrw---x askapache:askapache 777:666 [06/10/10 | 06/10/10 | 06/10/10] [d] /web/cg/tmp The key is: # -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' which believe it or not took me hundreds of tweaking before I was happy with the output. You can easily use this within a function to do whatever you want.. This simple function works recursively if you call it with -r as an argument, and sorts by file permissions. lsl(){ O="-maxdepth 1";sed -n '/-r/!Q1'<<<[email protected] &&O=;find $PWD $O -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'|sort -rgbS 50%; } Personally I'm using this function because: lll () { local a KS="1 -r -g"; sed -n '/-sort=/!Q1' <<< [email protected] && KS=`sed 's/.*-sort=\(.*\)/\1/g'<<<[email protected]`; find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'|sort -k$KS -bS 50%; } # i can sort by user lll -sort=3 # or sort by group reversed lll -sort=4 -r # and sort by modification time lll -sort=6 If anyone wants to help me make this function handle multiple dirs/files like ls, go for it and I would appreciate it.. Something very minimal would be awesome.. maybe like: for a; do lll $a; done Note this uses the latest version of GNU find built from source, easy to build from gnu ftp tarball. Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    8
    find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'
    AskApache · 2010-06-10 22:03:08 4

  • 8
    compgen -c | sort -u > commands && less commands
    Habitual · 2012-04-27 14:19:05 1
  • order the files by modification (thanks stanishjohnd) time, one file per output line and filter first 10


    7
    ls -1t | head -n10
    wires · 2009-06-23 12:15:12 3
  • This is a simple command, but extremely useful. It's a quick way to search the file names in the current directory for a substring. Normally people use "ls *term*" but that requires the stars and is not case insensitive. Color (for both ls and grep) is an added bonus.


    6
    alias lg='ls --color=always | grep --color=always -i'
    kFiddle · 2009-04-11 23:15:12 3

  • 6
    echo .*
    unixmonkey7109 · 2009-11-21 04:07:28 2
  • Tested and works on Linux. Show Sample Output


    4
    ls --quoting-style={escape,shell,c}
    stubby · 2010-08-17 16:50:38 0
  • Works on current directory, with built-in sorting. Show Sample Output


    4
    ls -Xp | grep -Eo "\.[^/]+$" | sort | uniq
    Amarok · 2011-02-10 20:47:59 0
  • This sorts files in multiple directories by their modification date. Note that sorting is done at the end using "sort", instead of using the "-ltr" options to "ls". This ensures correct results when sorting a large number of files, in which case "find" will call "ls" multiple times.


    4
    find . -type f -exec ls -l --full-time {} + | sort -k 6,7
    quadcore · 2012-08-03 22:22:51 0
  • ls -lhR Lists everithing using -l "long listing format" wich includes the space used by the folder. Displays it in -h "human readable form" (i.e. 2.2G, 32K), and -R recurses subfolders. grep -e using a regex, show lines containing the word "total" or a ":" at the end of the line (those with the name of the folder) only. Show Sample Output


    4
    ls -lhR | grep -e "total\|:$"
    Sebasg · 2013-01-22 04:58:51 6
  • yes 6 (tail from 6th line)


    3
    ls -t | tail +6 | xargs rm
    negyvenot · 2009-09-16 06:33:07 0
  • Using column to format a directory listing Show Sample Output


    3
    (printf "PERMISSIONS LINKS OWNER GROUP SIZE MONTH DAY HH:MM PROG-NAME\n" \ ; ls -l | sed 1d) | column -t
    opexxx · 2009-10-08 11:53:38 2
  • This shows every bit of information that stat can get for any file, dir, fifo, etc. It's great because it also shows the format and explains it for each format option. If you just want stat help, create this handy alias 'stath' to display all format options with explanations. alias stath="stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'" To display on 2 lines: ( F=/etc/screenrc N=c IFS=$'\n'; for L in $(sed 's/%Z./%Z\n/'<<<`stat --h|sed -n '/^ *%/s/^ *%\(.\).*$/\1:%\1/p'`); do G=$(echo "stat -$N '$L' \"$F\""); eval $G; N=fc;done; ) For a similarly powerful stat-like function optimized for pretty output (and can sort by any field), check out the "lll" function http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5815/advanced-ls-output-using-find-for-formattedsortable-file-stat-info From my .bash_profile -> http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    statt(){ C=c;stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'|while read l;do p=${l/% */};[ $p == %Z ]&&C=fc&&echo ^FS:^;echo "`stat -$C $p \"$1\"` ^$p^${l#%* }";done|column -ts^; }
    AskApache · 2010-06-11 23:31:03 0
  • Like normal ls, but only lists directories. Can be used with -l to get more details (ls -lad */) Show Sample Output


    3
    ls -ad */
    tbekolay · 2011-12-10 17:08:07 0
  • I'm sure there's a more elegant sed version for the tr + grep section.


    3
    ls | tr '[[:punct:][:space:]]' '\n' | grep -v "^\s*$" | sort | uniq -c | sort -bn
    qdrizh · 2014-10-14 09:52:28 0
  • The command finds every item within the directory and edits the output so that subdirectories are and files are output much like the tree command Show Sample Output


    3
    find . -print | sed -e 's;[^/]*/;|-- ;g;s;-- |; |;g'
    jonavon · 2019-09-25 17:49:35 2
  • I use terminal with black background on the Mac. Unfortunately, the default ls color for the directory is blue, which is very hard to see. By including the line above in my ~/.bash_profile file, I changed the directory's color to cyan, which is easer to see. For more information on the syntax of the LSCOLORS shell variable: man ls I tested this command on Mac OS X Leopard


    2
    export LSCOLORS=gxfxcxdxbxegedabagacad
    haivu · 2009-05-04 04:07:36 2
  • Sometimes it is handy to be able to list contents of a tar file within a compressed archive, such as 7Zip in this instance, without having to extract the archive first. This is especially helpful when dealing with larger sized files.


    2
    7z x -so testfile.tar.7z | tar tvf -
    slashdot · 2009-07-15 21:00:58 1

  • 2
    ls -d .*
    yooreck · 2009-11-23 15:58:52 0
  • You may also use the $(which foo) variant instead of backticks. I personnaly have an alias ll='ls -l'. Show Sample Output


    2
    ls -l `which foo`
    adeverteuil · 2010-07-09 01:34:02 0

  • 2
    ls -1d */
    Avenger · 2011-08-07 05:10:12 0
  • Tells you everything you could ever want to know about all files and subdirectories. Great for package creators. Totally secure too. On my Slackware box, this gets set upon login: LS_OPTIONS='-F -b -T 0 --color=auto' and alias ls='/bin/ls $LS_OPTIONS' which works great. Show Sample Output


    2
    lsr() { find "${@:-.}" -print0 |sort -z |xargs -0 ls $LS_OPTIONS -dla; }
    h3xx · 2011-08-15 03:10:58 0

  • 2
    ls -l `which gcc`
    bhinesley · 2011-11-14 01:28:34 0
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Recursively create a TAGS file for an entire source tree. TAGS files are useful for editors like Vim and Emacs

Display current time in requested time zones.
The time zone names come from the tz database which is usually found at /usr/share/zoneinfo.

Display a list of RPMs installed on a particular date
Find out which RPMs were installed on a particular date. These would (naturally) include update RPMs. This example shows searching for "Thu 05 Mar" (with grep). Alternatively, pipe it to less so you can search inside less (with less's neat text highlighting of the search term): rpm -qa --queryformat '%{installtime} \"%{vendor}\" %{name}-%{version}-%{release} %{installtime:date}\n' | less # (this example) search term: Thu 05 Mar

grep across a git repo and open matching files in gedit

Grep by paragraph instead of by line.
This is a command that I find myself using all the time. It works like regular grep, but returns the paragraph containing the search pattern instead of just the line. It operates on files or standard input. $ grepp or $ | grepp

Record live sound in Vorbis (eg for bootlegs or to take audio notes)
This will record the capture channel of your soundcard, directly encoded in Ogg Vorbis, in stereo at quality 5 (I'm using this to record live jam sessions from my line input). You can choose which device to capture (eg. line input, microphone or PCM output) with $ alsamixer -V capture You can do the same thing and live encode in MP3 or FLAC if you wish, just check FLAC and LAME man pages.

find and remove old compressed backup files
remove all compressed files in /home/ folder not created in the last 10 days

Display which distro is installed
Works on nearly all linux distros

Count lines of code across multiple file types, sorted by least amount of code to greatest
The same as the other two alternatives, but now less forking! Instead of using '\;' to mark the end of an -exec command in GNU find, you can simply use '+' and it'll run the command only once with all the files as arguments. This has two benefits over the xargs version: it's easier to read and spaces in the filesnames work automatically (no -print0). [Oh, and there's one less fork, if you care about such things. But, then again, one is equal to zero for sufficiently large values of zero.]

Show sorted list of files with sizes more than 1MB in the current dir
no fancy grep stuff here.


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