Commands using tr (331)

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Bytebeat
Never ending music, generated via a C snippet, piped to aplay. Taken from: http://canonical.org/~kragen/bytebeat/

du with colored bar graph
i'm using gawk, you may get varying mileage with other varieties. You might want to change the / after du to say, /home/ or /var or something, otherwise this command might take quite some time to complete. Sorry it's so obsfucated, I had to turn a script into a one-liner under 255 characters for commandlinefu. Note: the bar ratio is relative, so the highest ratio of the total disk, "anchors" the rest of the graph. EDIT: the math was slightly wrong, fixed it. Also, made it compliant with older versions of df.

back ssh from firewalled hosts
host B (you) redirects a modem port (62220) to his local ssh. host A is a remote machine (the ones that issues the ssh cmd). once connected port 5497 is in listening mode on host B. host B just do a ssh 127.0.0.1 -p 5497 -l user and reaches the remote host'ssh. This can be used also for vnc and so on.

list files recursively by size

Capture video of a linux desktop
Proper screencast with audio using ffmpeg and x264, as per http://verb3k.wordpress.com/2010/01/26/how-to-do-proper-screencasts-on-linux/

Find all the links to a file
This command finds and prints all the symbolic and hard links to a file. Note that the file argument itself be a link and it will find the original file as well. You can also do this with the inode number for a file or directory by first using stat or ls or some other tool to get the number like so: $ stat -Lc %i file or $ ls -Hid file And then using: $ find -L / -inum INODE_NUMBER -exec ls -ld {} +

Reset hosed terminal,
stty sane resets the tty to basic usable function. The ^J is a newline -- sometimes CR/LF interpretation is broken so use the ^J explicitly.

Use bash history with process substitution
Bash has a great history system of its commands accessed by the ! built-in history expansion operator (documented elsewhere on this site or on the web). You can combine the ! operator inside the process redirection

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested


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