Commands tagged watch (54)

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a function to find the fastest free DNS server
Evoke from the command like as: $ timeDNS commandlinefu.com . This isn't too terribly practical, but it is a good code example of using subshells to run the queries in parallel and the use of an "anonymous function" (a/k/a "inline group") to group i/o. . I'm assuming you have already defined your local DNS cache as ${local_DNS}, (here, it's 192.168.0.1). . You do need to install `moreutils` to get `sponge`. . If you're willing to wait, a slower version w/o sponge, (and w/o sorting), is this: . DNS () { for x in "192.168.0.1" "208.67.222.222" "208.67.220.220" "198.153.192.1" "198.153.194.1" "156.154.70.1" "156.154.71.1" "8.8.8.8" "8.8.4.4"; do (echo -n "$x "; dig @"$x" "$*"|grep Query) ; done ; }

Google Translate
Usage: $ translate Example: $ translate hello en es See this for a list of language codes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ISO_639-1_codes

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

power off system in X minutes
Replace 60 with the number of minutes until you want the machine to shut down. Alternatively give an absolute time in the format hh:mm (shutdown -h 9:30) Or shutdown right away (shutdown -h now)

Intercept, monitor and manipulate a TCP connection.
This will handle multiple incoming connections. Also, found sed works best with -u flag (unbuffered io). Easiest way I've found to get ncat is to install nmap.

convert a line to a space

Easy Persistent SSH Connections Using Screen
Use as: $ s host1 Will ssh to remote host upon first invocation. Then use C-a d to detatch. Running "s host1" again will resume the shell session on the remote host. Only useful in LAN environment. You'd want to start the screen on the remote host over a WAN. Adapted from Hack 34 in Linux Server Hacks 2nd Addition.

Batch Convert SVG to PNG (in parallel)
Convert some SVG files into PNG using ImageMagick's convert command. Run the conversions in parallel to save time. This is safer than robinro's forkbomb approach :-) xargs runs four processes at a time -P4

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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