Commands using vmstat (8)


  • 14
    watch vmstat -sSM
    0disse0 · 2011-06-16 18:02:24 0
  • Also useful with iostat, or pretty much anything else you want timestamped. Show Sample Output


    8
    vmstat 1 | awk '{now=strftime("%Y-%m-%d %T "); print now $0}'
    inevitability · 2009-07-17 07:41:57 4

  • 6
    (echo "set terminal png;plot '-' u 1:2 t 'cpu' w linespoints;"; sudo vmstat 2 10 | awk 'NR > 2 {print NR, $13}') | gnuplot > plot.png
    grokskookum · 2009-09-23 16:40:13 6
  • % cat ph-vmstat.awk # Return human readable numbers function hrnum(a) { b = a ; if (a > 1000000) { b = sprintf("%2.2fM", a/1000000) ; } else if (a > 1000) { b = sprintf("%2.2fK", a/1000) ; } return(b) ; } # Return human readable storage function hrstorage(a) { b = a ; if (a > 1024000) { b = sprintf("%2.2fG", a/1024/1024) ; } else if (a > 1024) { b = sprintf("%2.2fM", a/1024) ; } return(b) ; } OFS=" " ; $1 !~ /[0-9].*/ {print} $1 ~ /[0-9].*/ { $4 = hrstorage($4) ; $5 = hrstorage($5) ; $9 = hrnum($9) ; $10 = hrnum($10) ; $17 = hrnum($17) ; $18 = hrnum($18) ; $19 = hrnum($19) ; print ; } Show Sample Output


    5
    vmstat 1 10 | /usr/xpg4/bin/awk -f ph-vmstat.awk
    MarcoN · 2009-05-04 04:55:00 0
  • Monitor with watch command and vmstat, memory usage Show Sample Output


    4
    watch vmstat -sSM
    servermanaged · 2009-12-04 22:35:45 0
  • See man vmstat for information about the statistics. This does the same thing without the timestamp: vmstat 5 Show Sample Output


    3
    while [ 1 ]; do echo -n "`date +%F_%T`" ; vmstat 1 2 | tail -1 ; sleep 4; done
    plasticboy · 2009-03-26 19:16:55 0
  • You can use this one-liner for a quick and dirty (more customizable) alternative to the watch command. The keys to making this work: everything exists in an infinite loop; the loop starts with a clear; the loop ends with a sleep. Enter whatever you'd like to keep an eye on in the middle. Show Sample Output


    1
    while (true); do clear; uname -n; echo ""; df -h /; echo ""; tail -5 /var/log/auth.log; echo ""; vmstat 1 5; sleep 15; done
    roknir · 2010-08-23 04:37:58 0
  • draw `vmstat ` data using gnuplot


    0
    vmstat 2 10 | awk 'NR > 2 {print NR, $13}' | gnuplot -e "set terminal png;set output 'v.png';plot '-' u 1:2 t 'cpu' w linespoints;"
    Sunng · 2009-09-23 07:19:47 0

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