Commands using tail (284)

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Find the package that installed a command

Quickly CD Out Of Directories
`up 3` will climb the directory tree by three steps. `up asdf` will do nothing, and returns exit code 1 as an error should.

Resize all JPEGs in a directory
This command requires the imagemagick libraries and will resize all files with the .jpg extension to a width of 1024 pixels and will keep the same proportions as the original image.

Calculates the number of physical cores considering HyperThreading in AWK
Check whether hyperthreading is enabled or not. a better solution as nproc should work on all OS with awk

Apply substitution only on the line following a marker
I've been auto-generating some complex GnuPlots; with multiplots the first plot of each group needs to be a 'plot' whereas the others need to be 'replots' to allow overplotting/autoscaling/etc to work properly. This is used to replace only the first instance of 'replot'.

Separates each frame of a animated gif file to a counted file, then appends the frames together into one sheet file. Useful for making sprite sheets for games.
requires imagemagick

Remove duplicate rows of an un-sorted file based on a single column
The command (above) will remove any duplicate rows based on the FIRST column of data in an un-sorted file. The '$1' represents a positional parameter. You can change both instances of '$1' in the command to remove duplicates based on a different column, for instance, the third: $ awk '{ if ($3 in stored_lines) x=1; else print; stored_lines[$3]=1 }' infile.txt > outfile.txt Or you can change it to '$0' to base the removal on the whole row: $ awk '{ if ($0 in stored_lines) x=1; else print; stored_lines[$0]=1 }' infile.txt > outfile.txt ** Note: I wouldn't use this on a MASSIVE file, unless you're RAM-rich ;) **

How to stop MAC Address via IPTables
edit the /etc/sysconfig/iptables file and try to work whit this: -A INPUT -i (interface) -m mac (mac address) -j ACCEPT/DROP

Rename files in batch

Find out what the day ends in
Several people have submitted commands to do this, but I think this is the simplest solution. It also happens to be the most portable one: It should work with any sh or csh derived shell under any UNIX-like OS. Oh by the way, with my German locale ($LC_TIME set appropriately) it prints "g" most of the time, and sometimes (on Wednesdays) it prints "h". It never prints "y".


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