Commands by d34dh0r53 (5)

  • Prints the top 10 memory consuming processes (with children and instances aggregated) sorted by total RSS and calculates the percentage of total RAM each uses. Please note that since RSS can include shared libraries it is possible for the percentages to add up to more that the total amount of RAM, but this still gives you a pretty good idea. Also note that this does not work with the mawk version of awk, but it works fine with GNU Awk which is on most Linux systems. It also does not work on OS X. Show Sample Output


    3
    TR=`free|grep Mem:|awk '{print $2}'`;ps axo rss,comm,pid|awk -v tr=$TR '{proc_list[$2]+=$1;} END {for (proc in proc_list) {proc_pct=(proc_list[proc]/tr)*100; printf("%d\t%-16s\t%0.2f%\n",proc_list[proc],proc,proc_pct);}}'|sort -n |tail -n 10
    d34dh0r53 · 2010-03-27 01:34:50 4
  • This command loops over all of the processes in a system and creates an associative array in awk with the process name as the key and the sum of the RSS as the value. The associative array has the effect of summing a parent process and all of it's children. It then prints the top ten processes sorted by size. Show Sample Output


    5
    ps axo rss,comm,pid | awk '{ proc_list[$2]++; proc_list[$2 "," 1] += $1; } END { for (proc in proc_list) { printf("%d\t%s\n", proc_list[proc "," 1],proc); }}' | sort -n | tail -n 10
    d34dh0r53 · 2010-03-03 16:41:05 2
  • I prefer the ip command to ifconfig as ifconfig is supposedly going to be deprecated. Certain IP address aliases can only be seen with the ip command (such as the ones applied by RHCS).


    6
    ip link show
    d34dh0r53 · 2010-03-01 20:10:27 0
  • Change the name of the process and what is echoed to suit your needs. The brackets around the h in the grep statement cause grep to skip over "grep httpd", it is the equivalent of grep -v grep although more elegant. Show Sample Output


    6
    TOTAL_RAM=`free | head -n 2 | tail -n 1 | awk '{ print $2 }'`; PROC_RSS=`ps axo rss,comm | grep [h]ttpd | awk '{ TOTAL += $1 } END { print TOTAL }'`; PROC_PCT=`echo "scale=4; ( $PROC_RSS/$TOTAL_RAM ) * 100" | bc`; echo "RAM Used by HTTP: $PROC_PCT%"
    d34dh0r53 · 2010-02-26 20:29:45 3
  • Provides numerically sorted human readable du output. I so wish there was just a du flag for this. Show Sample Output


    4
    du -x --max-depth=1 | sort -n | awk '{ print $2 }' | xargs du -hx --max-depth=0
    d34dh0r53 · 2010-02-18 19:46:47 2

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