Commands by andreisid (14)

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List the size of all sub folders and files from the current location, with sorting

notify brightness level [custom]
Brightness indicator to be used in scripts that adjust brightness [especially sys that doesn't support automatically]

Convert A USB Cable Into A Smart Home Gadget
An old USB A/B cable is all you need to make your own Smart Home hardware! Cut off and discard the B-portion of the USB cable. On the A side, connect the RED (+) and WHITE (D-) wires via a 1 kiloohm resistor. $Picture: http://imgur.com/dJGVlAU Now plug the cable into a USB port on your Linux computer. Your hardware is ready! Run the above command after changing variable mysms to your personal email-to-SMS gateway info as required by your cellular service provider. The command uses the amazing usbmon tool (see link below) to detect the cable. For the curious, to view the raw usbmon output, run this command: (Also see the sample output) $usbmon -i usb0 How does it work? When the red and white wires are connected (via the 1 kiloohm resistor) the USB hardwere is tricked into thinking that a new USB device is trying to start up. We then use the usbmon utility to capture the host USB events as it tries to talk to the cable. The expect utility watches the usbmon stream and waits for the disconnect text "-2:128" before sending the SMS message. Finally, the sendmail tool is used to email the SMS message to your smartphone via your cellular provider's SMS-to-email gateway. As a result, when the electrical connection between the red and white wire is interrupted, or the USB cable is unplugged from your computer, you get an SMS notification of the disconnect event on your smartphone. Could this be the cheapest smart home gadget ever? What are YOU going to sense with it? Please let me know in the comments and please don't forget to click it up! $ $Links: $ http://www.linuxcertif.com/man/8/usbmon/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB#Pinouts http://imgur.com/dJGVlAU

Write a shell script that removes files that contain a string
Deletes files in the current directory or its subdirectories that match "regexp" but handle directories, newlines, spaces, and other funky characters better than the original #13315. Also uses grep's "-q" to be quiet and quit at the first match, making this much faster. No need for awk either.

Remove all unused kernels with apt-get
This will remove all installed kernels on your debian based install, except the one you're currently using. From: http://tuxtweaks.com/2009/12/remove-old-kernels-in-ubuntu/comment-page-1/#comment-1590

find all active IP addresses in a network
Have to run as superuser... but easier and more informational if you are looking for actual devices. Need to install arp-scan.

Unaccent an entire directory tree with files.
This command changes all filename and directories within a directory tree to unaccented ones. I had to do this to 'sanitize' some samba-exported trees. The reason it works might seem a little difficult to see at first - it first reverses-sort by pathname length, then it renames only the basename of the path. This way it'll always go in the right order to rename everything. Some notes: 1. You'll have to have the 'unaccent' command. On Ubuntu, just aptitude install unaccent. 2. In this case, the encoding of the tree was UTF-8 - but you might be using another one, just adjust the command to your encoding. 3. The program might spit a few harmless errors saying the files are the same - not to fear.

graphical memory usage
smem is very clever, it keeps in mind shared memory in its calculations!!! http://www.selenic.com/smem/

Find all directories on filesystem containing more than 99MB
Finds all directories containing more than 99MB of files, and prints them in human readable format. The directories sizes do not include their subdirectories, so it is very useful for finding any single directory with a lot of large files.

en/decrypts files in a specific directory
To decrypt the files replace "ccenrypt" with "ccdecrypt. ccrypt(1) must be installed. It uses the AES (Rijndael) block cipher. To make it handier create an alias.


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