Commands by hfs (18)

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Map the slot of an I/O card to its PCI bus address
Recent hardware may or may not enumerate *both of* these values

Limit the cpu usage of a process
This will limit the average amount of CPU it consumes.

Send an email from the terminal when job finishes
Sends an email from the terminal.

Realy remove file from your drive
This command remove a file from your filesystem like the normal rm command but instead of deleting only the inode information this also delete the data that was stored on blocks /!\ warning this may be long for large files

Labyrinth pattern
Generates labyrinth-like pattern on UTF-8 terminal in bash. For fun ;)

Check if x86 Solaris based system is 32bit or 64bit
This is likely only valid on Solaris based systems. Unfortunately a lot of the more universal techniques for determining if a system is 32bit or 64bit on x86 solaris fail to give much more information than "i86pc"

Install a basic FreeBSD system
Install a basic FreeBSD system on a distant server. I use this to install FreeBSD on servers that can only boot a Linux rescue system. This sytem loads on ram when booted, so it is possible to install freely. You can even install on ZFS root !

apt-get via sudo
An apt-get wrapper function which will run the command via sudo, but will run it normally if you're only downloading source files. This was a bit of an excuse to show off the framework of $ cmd && echo true || echo false ...but as you can see, you must be careful about what is in the "true" block to make sure it executes without error, otherwise the "false" block will be executed. To allow the apt-get return code to pass through, you need to use a more normal if/else block: $ apt-get () { if [ "$1" = source ]; then command apt-get "$@"; else sudo apt-get "$@"; fi }

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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