Commands tagged random (98)

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Check if your desired password is already available in haveibeenpwnd database. This command uses the API provided by HIBP

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

list files recursively by size

Quick directory bookmarks
Set a bookmark as normal shell variable $ p=/cumbersome/path/to/project To go there $ to p This saves one "$" and is faster to type ;-) The variable is still useful as such: $ vim $p/ will expand the variable (at least in bash) and show a list of files to edit. If setting the bookmarks is too much typing you could add another function $ bm() { eval $1=$(pwd); } then bookmark the current directory with $ bm p

Don't save commands in bash history (only for current session)
Unsetting HISTFILE avoid getting current session history list saved.

Display two calendar months side by side
Displays last month, current month, and next month side by side.

Empty a file
Immediately make a file empty. This even works if the file is still being written to. Great for cleaning up huge log files!

matrix in your term
-a : Asynchronous scroll -b : Bold characters on -x : X window mode, use if your xterm is using mtx.pcf

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

bash shell expansion
The expansion {,} in bash will repeat the given string once for each item seperated by commas. The given command will result in the following being run: cp /really/long/path/and/file/name /really/long/path/and/file/name-`date -I` These can be embedded as needed, ex: rm file{1,2,3{1,2,3}} would delete the files file1, file2, file31, file32, file32, and no other files.


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