Commands by pdxdoughnut (30)

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convert wav files to ogg
cd to the folder containing the wav files and convert them all to ogg format. in my sample output i use the -a and -l flags to set the author and album title. to get the oggenc program in ubuntu linux run: sudo apt-get install oggenc

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Open a man page as a PDF in Gnome
Would be better if gnome-open would accept std in Should be doable in KDE - anyone?

convert strings toupper/tolower with tr

Check tcp-wrapping support
This function returns TRUE if the application supports tcp-wrapping or FALSE if not by reading the shared libraries used by this application.

Define shell variable HISTIGNORE so that comments (lines starting with #) appear in shell history
I was surprised to find that with RedHat bash, I could not find any comment lines (begining with #) in my bash shell history. Surprised because in Mageia Linux this works. It turns out that RedHat's bash will keep comment lines if in my .bashrc, I define: export HISTIGNORE=' cd "`*: PROMPT_COMMAND=?*?' Why have comment lines in shell history? It's a handy and convenient way to make proto-commands (to be completed later) and for storing brief text data that is searchable in shell history.

useless load
check your load with top... Start more of these jobs to get an multi-core cpu busy...

commentate specified line of a file
used when modify several configuration files with a single command

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Puts every word from a file into a new line
Simply translates whitespace to newlines. Could be enhanced to compress out extra newlines, but that might be better handled in the next tool down the pipe, with eg uniq(1).


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