Commands tagged disk usage (39)

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Run a command when a file is changed

Url Encode
Returns URL Encoded string from input ($1).

remove comments (even those starting with spaces), empty lines (even those containing spaces) in one grep command
useful for discarding even those comments which start with blanks or those empty lines which contain blanks

Test network speed without wasting disk
The above command will send 4GB of data from one host to the next over the network, without consuming any unnecessary disk on either the client nor the host. This is a quick and dirty way to benchmark network speed without wasting any time or disk space. Of course, change the byte size and count as necessary. This command also doesn't rely on any extra 3rd party utilities, as dd, ssh, cat, /dev/zero and /dev/null are installed on all major Unix-like operating systems.

show current directory
Opens a file or URL in the user's preferred application.

Merge Two or More PDFs into a New Document
require the pdftk package

fetch all revisions of a specific file in an SVN repository
Manages everything through one sed script instead of pipes of greps and awks. Quoting of shell variables is generally easier within a sed script.

Kick user

Periodic Log Deletion
deletes logs not modified in over [#] days - modify to compress or move, as needed

Use mplayer to save video streams to a file
I use this command to save RTSP video streams over night from one of our national TV stations, so I won't have to squeeze the data through my slow internet connection when I want to watch it the next day. For ease of use, you might want to put this in a file: #!/bin/bash FILE="`basename \"$1\"`" mplayer -dumpstream -dumpfile "$FILE" -playlist "$1"


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