Commands by PhillipNordwall (9)

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Command line calculator
This opens a python command line. You can use math and random and float-division is enabled (without appending .0 to integers). I just don't know how to specify a standard precision.

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

start vim in diff mode
vim will open both files side by side and show colored diffs

list all opened ports on host

View ~/.ssh/known_hosts key information
Will return the SSH server key information for each host you have in your ~/.ssh/known_hosts file, including key size, key fingerprint, key IP address or domain name, and key type.

Don't like the cut command? Tired of typing awk '{print $xxx}', try this

Find all the files more than 10MB, sort in descending order of size and record the output of filenames and size in a text file.
This command specifies the size in Kilobytes using 'k' in the -size +(N)k option. The plus sign says greater than. -exec [cmd] {} \; invokes ls -l command on each file and awk strips off the values of the 5th (size) and the 9th (filename) column from the ls -l output to display. Sort is done in reversed order (descending) numerically using sort -rn options. A cron job could be run to execute a script like this and alert the users if a dir has files exceeding certain size, and provide file details as well.

Console clock
Shows a simple clock in the console -t param removes the watch header Ctrl-c to exit

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

List all files modified by a command
Often you run a command, but afterwards you're not quite sure what it did. By adding this prefix/suffix around [COMMAND], you can list any files that were modified. . Take a nanosecond timestamp: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.NNNNNNNNN $ date "+%F %T.%N" . Find any files that have been modified since that timestamp: $ find . -newermt "$D" . This command currently only searches below the current directory. If you want to look elsewhere change the find parameter, e.g. $ find /var/log . -newermt "$D"


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