Commands by leonteale (6)

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Create a CD/DVD ISO image from disk.
Many like to use 'dd' for creating CD/DVD iso images. This is bad. Very bad. The reason this is, is 'dd' doesn't have any built-in error checking. So, you don't know if you got all the bits or not. As such, it is not the right tool for the job. Instead, 'reaom' (read optical media) from the wodim package is what you should be using. It has built-in error checking. Similarly, if you want to burn your newly creating ISO, stay away from 'dd', and use: $ wodim -v -eject /path/to/image.iso

Find files changed between dates defined by ctime of two files specified by name
This command finds all the files whose status has changed between the ctime of the older and newer . Very useful if you can see from an ls listing a block of consecutive files you want to move or delete, but can't figure out exactly the time range by date.

Look for English words in /dev/urandom
Little faster alternative.

Extract shortcuts and hostnames from .ssh/config
Spits out table that shows your Host->HostName aliases in ~/.ssh/config

uniq without pre-sorting
Reads stdin, and outputs each line only once - without sorting ahead of time. This does use more memory than your system's sort utility.

Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).

Top 10 Memory Processes
It displays the top 10 processes sorted by memory usage

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Compare a remote file with a local file

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.


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