Commands by Octave (6)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

eth-tool summary of eth# devices
Give the Speed and Link status of eth# 0-3. This is sort of what mii-tool does, but eth-tool is better, yet lacks device discovery.

Download entire website for offline viewing
?mirror : turn on options suitable for mirroring. -p : download all files that are necessary to properly display a given HTML page. ?convert-links : after the download, convert the links in document for local viewing. -P ./LOCAL-DIR : save all the files and directories to the specified directory.

relabel current konsole tab
usage: renam in a script you must replace $PPID with $(awk '{print $4}' /prod/$PPID/stat)

Print all lines between two line numbers
Print all lines between two line numbers This command uses sed(1) to print all lines between two known line numbers in a file. Useful for seeing output in a log file, where the line numbers are known. The above command will print all lines between, and including, lines 3 and 6.

export iPad App list to txt file
This will generate the same output without changing the current directory, and filepath will be relative to the current directory. Note: it will (still) fail if your iTunes library is in a non-standard location.

Get info about remote host ports and OS detection
Where < target > may be a single IP, a hostname or a subnet -sS TCP SYN scanning (also known as half-open, or stealth scanning) -P0 option allows you to switch off ICMP pings. -sV option enables version detection -O flag attempt to identify the remote operating system Other option: -A option enables both OS fingerprinting and version detection -v use -v twice for more verbosity. $ nmap -sS -P0 -A -v < target >

Search some text from all files inside a directory

Show used disk space:

execute your commands hiding secret bits from history records
$ wget --user=username --password="$password" http://example.org/ Instead of hiding commands entirely from history, I prefer to use "read" to put the password into a variable, and then use that variable in the commands instead of the password. Without the "-e" and "-s" it should work in any bourne-type shell, but the -s is what makes sure the password doesn't get echoed to the screen at all. (-e makes editing work a bit better)

Show current working directory of a process


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: