Commands by Tuirgin (2)

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Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Split File in parts
Split File in 19 MB big parts, putting parts together again via cat Nameforpartaa Nameforpartab Nameforpartac >> File

Calculating series with awk: add numbers from 1 to 100
"seq 100" outputs 1,2,..,100, separated by newlines. awk adds them up and displays the sum. "seq 1 2 11" outputs 1,3,..,11. Variations: 1+3+...+(2n-1) = n^2 $ seq 1 2 19 | awk '{sum+=$1} END {print sum}' # displays 100 1/2 + 1/4 + ... = 1 $ seq 10 | awk '{sum+=1/(2**$1)} END {print sum}' # displays 0.999023

Get count of kilobytes brew cleanup would free

Remove security limitations from PDF documents using ghostscript (for Windows)
#4345 also works under windows

Using the urxvt terminal daemon
- for .xsession use - Advantages of running a urxvt daemon include faster creation time for terminal windows and a lot of saved memory. You can start new terminals as childs of urxvtd by typing urxvtc. Another advantage is, that background jobs are always owned by the urxvtd and will survive as long the daemon is running.

Get length of current playlist in xmms2

Length of longest line of code
Here's an awk version.

Fast, built-in pipe-based data sink
This is shorter and actually much faster than >/dev/null (see sample output for timings) Plus, it looks like a disappointed face emoticon.


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