Commands using ls (513)

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Sniffing network to generate a pcap file in CLI mode on a remote host and open it via local Wireshark ( GUI ).
Then hit ^C to stop, get the file by scp, and you can now use wireshark like this : $ wireshark /tmp/sniff.pcap If you have tshark on remote host, you could use that : $ wireshark -k -i

Use lynx to run repeating website actions
This command will tell lynx to read keystrokes from the specified file - which can be used in a cronjob to auto-login on websites that give you points for logging in once a day *cough cough* (which is why I used -accept_all_cookies). For creating your keystroke file, use: $ lynx -cmd_log yourfile

Unzip and untar a *.tar.gz file in one go to a specific directory
A *.tar.gz file needs to be unzipped & then untarred. Previously I might have unzipped first with $gunzip -d file.tar.gz and then untarred the result with $tar -xvf file.tar (Options are extract, verbose, file) Using the -z (decompress) option on tar avoids the use of gzip (or gunzip) first. Additionally the -C option will specify the directory to extract to.

Find Duplicate Files (based on size first, then MD5 hash)
This dup finder saves time by comparing size first, then md5sum, it doesn't delete anything, just lists them.

Convert JSON to YAML (unicode safe)
If you tried the other Python version of Convert JSON to YAML and you end up with lines that has "!!python/unicode", this version of the command is for you.

List status of your git repos and let us know if there is any new files to commit.
Source: http://www.bashoneliners.com/oneliners/oneliner/225/

Batch rename extension of all files in a folder, in the example from .txt to .md
Same thing using bash built-in features instead of a sub-shell.

monitor memory usage

Find files recursively that were updated in the last hour ignoring SVN files and folders.
Find files recursively that were updated in the last hour ignoring SVN files and folders. Incase you do a full svn up on accident.

take a screenshot of a webpage


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