Commands using ls (515)

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Rename files with vim.
Opens a list of files in a text editor. Using Vim as your default editor allows you to use the power of regex substitution and visual block mode to batch rename files. Found in the renameutils package sudo apt-get install renameutils

Copies currently played song in Audacious to selected directory
Maybe it could work for any music player if you change "audacious2" with the string you see in `ps aux` for your player. Needs testing in different systems.

Bitcoin Brainwallet Exponent Calculator
A bitcoin "brainwallet" is a secret passphrase you carry in your brain. The Bitcoin Brainwallet Exponent Calculator is one of three functions needed to calculate the bitcoin PRIVATE key. Roughly, the formula is exponent = sha256 (passphrase) Note that this is a bash function, which means you have to type its name to invoke it. You can check the accuracy of the results here http://brainwallet.org

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Use tee + process substitution to split STDOUT to multiple commands
Using process substitution, we can 'trick' tee into sending a command's STDOUT to an arbitrary number of commands. The last command (command4) in this example will get its input from the pipe.

Capture SMTP / POP3 Email

read Windows ACLs from Linux
You can read, add, delete and modify Windows permissions from Linux using smbcacls from the smb-client package.

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

Look up a unicode character by name
No need for further filedes or substitution for splitting. Simply use read a b

copy working directory and compress it on-the-fly while showing progress
What happens here is we tell tar to create "-c" an archive of all files in current dir "." (recursively) and output the data to stdout "-f -". Next we specify the size "-s" to pv of all files in current dir. The "du -sb . | awk ?{print $1}?" returns number of bytes in current dir, and it gets fed as "-s" parameter to pv. Next we gzip the whole content and output the result to out.tgz file. This way "pv" knows how much data is still left to be processed and shows us that it will take yet another 4 mins 49 secs to finish. Credit: Peteris Krumins http://www.catonmat.net/blog/unix-utilities-pipe-viewer/


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