Commands by eastwind (71)

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Convert CSV to JSON with miller
Using the csv tool `miller` you can transform a csv file into a json array of objects, where the properties are the values of the csv header line and the values are the values of the subsequent lines.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Show all available cows
There are lots of different cow options to use, this script will show them all

Faster find and move using the find and xargs commands. Almost as fast as locate.
Only tested on Linux Ubunty Hardy. Works when file names have spaces. The "-maxdepth 2" limits the find search to the current directory and the next one deeper in this example. This was faster on my system because find was searching every directory before the current directory without the -maxdepth option. Almost as fast as locate when used as above. Must use double quotes around pattern to handle spaces in file names. -print0 is used in combination with xargs -0. Those are zeros not "O"s. For xargs, -I is used to replace the following "{}" with the incoming file-list items from find. Echo just prints to the command line what is happening with mv. mv needs "{}" again so it knows what you are moving from. Then end with the move destination. Some other versions may only require one "{}" in the move command and not after the -I, however this is what worked for me on Ubuntu 8.04. Some like to use -type f in the find command to limit the type.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Squish repeated delimiters into one
This can be particularly useful used in conjunction with a following cut command like $echo "hello::::there" | tr -s ':' | cut -d':' -f2 which prints 'there'. Much easier that guessing at -f values for cut. I know 'tr -s' is used in lots of commands here already but I just figured out the -s flag and thought it deserved to be highlighted :)

Press a key automatically
Press a key automatically via xvkbd.

Grep for word in directory (recursive)
greps for search word in directory and below (defaults to cd). -i case insensitive -n shows line number -H shows file name

I hate `echo X | Y`
apart from not being generalisable to all shells, `Y <<< X` seems nicer to me than `echo X | Y`, e.g. $ <<< lol cat; it reads easier, you type less, and it also looks cool


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