Commands by xkill (1)

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List the URLs of tabs of the frontmost Chrome window in OS X
This also works with Safari if you just change the application name. Replace $ window 1 with $ windows to list the URLs of tabs in all windows instead of only the frontmost window. This also includes titles: $ osascript -e{'set o to""','tell app"google chrome"','repeat with t in tabs of window 1','set o to o&url of t&"\n"&" "&title of t&"\n"',end,end}|sed \$d .

Quick plotting of a function
The arguments of "seq" indicate the starting value, step size, and the end value of the x-range. "awk" outputs (x, f(x)) pairs and pipes them to "graph", which is part of the "plotutils" package.

Insert a comment on command line for reminder
Comments can be used directly on the command line so I can save in the history a brief description of what command does.

Number of .... indicate how far down to cd
Use dots to cd down directories instead of having to remember all of the pesky back slashes! Better yet, works on even and odd number of dots! Now, just estimate how far down you want to traverse.

Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).

Change gnome-shell wallpaper

psgrepp
grep по ps aux

diff current vi buffer edits against original file

Capture video of a linux desktop
This will grab the image from desktop, starting with the upper-left corner at x=100, y=200 with a width and height of 1024?768.

Get first Git commit hash
git log --format=%H | tail -1 doesn't work anymore


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