Commands tagged uptime (8)

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Extract domain from URl
Extracts 2nd-level domain part (or 3rd level, for co.* or com.*) from the URI's hostname. See sample output.

Delicious search with human readable output
You can install filterous with $ sudo apt-get install libxslt1-dev; sudo easy_install -U filterous

How to estimate the storage size of all files not named *.[extension] on the current directory
With this sentence we can estimate the storage size of all files not named *.jpg on the current directory. The syntax is based on Linux, for Unix compliance use: find ./* -prune ! -name '*.jpg' -ls |awk '{TOTAL+=$7} END {print int(TOTAL/(1024^2))"MB"}' We can change the jpg extension for whatever extension what we need

Watch the progress of 'dd'
This version was mentioned in the comments. Credits go to flatcap.

let the cow suggest some commit messages for you

Generate Random Passwords
If you want a password length longer than 6, changing the -c6 to read -c8 will give you 8 random characters instead of 6. To end up with a line-feed, use this with echo: # echo `< /dev/urandom tr -dc _A-Z-a-z-0-9 | head -c6`

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

grep binary (hexadecimal) patterns
-P activates the Perl regular expression mode.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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