Commands tagged perl (188)

  • Checks the Gmail ATOM feed for your account, parses it and outputs a list of unread messages. For some reason sed gets stuck on OS X, so here's a Perl version for the Mac: curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | perl -pe 's/^<title>(.*)<\/title>.*<name>(.*)<\/name>.*$/$2 - $1/' If you want to see the name of the last person, who added a message to the conversation, change the greediness of the operators like this: curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | perl -pe 's/^<title>(.*)<\/title>.*?<name>(.*?)<\/name>.*$/$2 - $1/' Show Sample Output


    46
    curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | sed -n "s/<title>\(.*\)<\/title.*name>\(.*\)<\/name>.*/\2 - \1/p"
    postrational · 2009-09-07 21:56:40 6
  • parse `lsmod' output and pass to `dot' drawing utility then finally pass it to an image viewer


    35
    lsmod | perl -e 'print "digraph \"lsmod\" {";<>;while(<>){@_=split/\s+/; print "\"$_[0]\" -> \"$_\"\n" for split/,/,$_[3]}print "}"' | dot -Tpng | display -
    bandie91 · 2011-11-27 14:02:35 12
  • recursively traverse the directory structure from . down, look for string "oldstring" in all files, and replace it with "newstring", wherever found also: grep -rl oldstring . |xargs perl -pi~ -e 's/oldstring/newstring'


    25
    $ grep -rl oldstring . |xargs sed -i -e 's/oldstring/newstring/'
    netfortius · 2009-03-03 20:10:19 9
  • OK, not the most useful but a good way to impress friends. Requires the "display" command from ImageMagick.


    25
    perl -e 'print "P1\n256 256\n", map {$_&($_>>8)?1:0} (0..0xffff)' | display
    dstahlke · 2009-07-08 17:50:23 7
  • This function takes a word or a phrase as arguments and then fetches definitions using Google's "define" syntax. The "nl" and perl portion isn't strictly necessary. It just makes the output a bit more readable, but this also works: define(){ local y="$@";curl -sA"Opera" "http://www.google.com/search?q=define:${y// /+}"|grep -Po '(?<=<li>)[^<]+';} If your version of grep doesn't have perl compatible regex support, then you can use this version: define(){ local y="$@";curl -sA"Opera" "http://www.google.com/search?q=define:${y// /+}"|grep -Eo '<li>[^<]+'|sed 's/<li>//g'|nl|perl -MHTML::Entities -pe 'decode_entities($_)' 2>/dev/null;} Show Sample Output


    18
    define(){ local y="$@";curl -sA"Opera" "http://www.google.com/search?q=define:${y// /+}"|grep -Po '(?<=<li>)[^<]+'|nl|perl -MHTML::Entities -pe 'decode_entities($_)' 2>/dev/null;}
    eightmillion · 2010-01-29 05:01:11 4
  • Print out list of all branches with last commit date to the branch, including relative time since commit and color coding. Show Sample Output


    16
    for k in `git branch|perl -pe s/^..//`;do echo -e `git show --pretty=format:"%Cgreen%ci %Cblue%cr%Creset" $k|head -n 1`\\t$k;done|sort -r
    brunost · 2009-06-03 08:25:00 3
  • works on Linux and Solaris. I think it will work on nearly all *nix-es Show Sample Output


    13
    ifconfig -a | perl -nle'/(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)/ && print $1'
    sneaker · 2009-07-31 09:49:17 4
  • This is a command that I find myself using all the time. It works like regular grep, but returns the paragraph containing the search pattern instead of just the line. It operates on files or standard input. grepp <PATTERN> <FILE> or <SOMECOMMAND> | grepp <PATTERN> Show Sample Output


    13
    grepp() { [ $# -eq 1 ] && perl -00ne "print if /$1/i" || perl -00ne "print if /$1/i" < "$2";}
    eightmillion · 2010-01-12 04:30:15 5
  • [Update! Thanks to a tip from ioggstream, I've fixed both of the bugs mentioned below.] You, yes, 𝙔𝙊𝙐, can be the terror of the Internet! Why use normal, boring bullet points in your text, when you could use a ROTATED HEAVY BLACK HEART BULLET (❥)!? (Which would also be an awesome band name, by the way).  This script makes it easy to find unusual characters from the command line. You can then cut and paste them or, if you're using a GTK application, type Control+Shift+U followed by the code point number (e.g., 2765) and then a SPACE.  USAGE: Put this script in a file (I called mine "ugrep") and make it executable. Run it from the command line like so,  ugrep heart  The output will look like this,  ☙ U+2619 REVERSED ROTATED FLORAL HEART BULLET ♡ U+2661 WHITE HEART SUIT ♥ U+2665 BLACK HEART SUIT ❣ U+2763 HEAVY HEART EXCLAMATION MARK ORNAMENT ❤ U+2764 HEAVY BLACK HEART ❥ U+2765 ROTATED HEAVY BLACK HEART BULLET ❦ U+2766 FLORAL HEART ❧ U+2767 ROTATED FLORAL HEART BULLET ⺖ U+2E96 CJK RADICAL HEART ONE ⺗ U+2E97 CJK RADICAL HEART TWO ⼼ U+2F3C KANGXI RADICAL HEART  You can, of course, use regular expressions. For example, if you are looking for the "pi" symbol, you could do this:  ugrep '\bpi\b'  REQUIREMENTS: Although this is written in Bash, it assumes you have Perl installed because it greps through the Perl Unicode character name module (/usr/lib/perl5/Unicode/CharName.pm). Note that it would not have made more sense to write this in Perl, since the CharName.pm module doesn't actually include a subroutine for looking up a character based on the description. (Weird.)  BUGS: In order to fit this script in the commandlinefu limits, a couple bugs were added. ① Astral characters beyond the BMP (basic multilingual plane) are not displayed correctly, but see below. ② Perl code from the perl module being grepped is sometimes extraneously matched.  MISFEATURES: Bash's printf cannot, given a Unicode codepoint, print the resulting character to the terminal. GNU's coreutils printf (usually "/usr/bin/printf") can do so, but it is brokenly pedantic about how many hexadecimal digits follow the escape sequence and will actually die with an error if you give the wrong number. This is especially annoying since Unicode code points are usually variable length with implied leading zeros. The CharNames.pm file represents BMP characters as 4 hexits, but astral characters as 5. In the actual version of this script that I use, I've kludged around this misfeature by zero-padding to 8 hexits like so,  /usr/bin/printf "\U$(printf "%08x" 0x$hex)"  TIP 1: The author recommends "xsel" for command line cut-and-paste. For example,  ugrep biohazard | xsel  TIP 2: In Emacs, instead of running this command in a subshell, you can type Unicode code points directly by pressing Control-Q first, but you'll likely want to change the default input from octal to hexadecimal. (setq read-quoted-char-radix 16).  TIP 3: Of course, if you're using X, and you want to type one of the more common unusual characters, it's easiest of all to do it with your Compose (aka Multi) key. For example, hitting [Compose] <3 types ♥. Show Sample Output


    12
    egrep -i "^[0-9a-f]{4,} .*$*" $(locate CharName.pm) | while read h d; do /usr/bin/printf "\U$(printf "%08x" 0x$h)\tU+%s\t%s\n" $h "$d"; done
    hackerb9 · 2010-12-31 16:47:59 5
  • This uses Perl's rename utility (you may have to call it as prename on your box) and won't choke on spaces or other characters in filenames. It will also zero pad a number even in filenames like "vacation-4.jpg".


    12
    rename 's/\d+/sprintf("%04d",$&)/e' *.jpg
    eightmillion · 2011-05-01 20:50:36 2
  • Fetches the IPs and ONLY the IPs from ifconfig. Simplest, shortest, cleanest. Perl is too good to be true... (P.S.: credit should go to Peteris Krumins at catonmat.net) Show Sample Output


    11
    ifconfig | perl -nle'/dr:(\S+)/ && print $1'
    xsawyerx · 2009-07-23 09:33:31 4
  • dpigs is in the package debian-goodies (debian/ubuntu)


    11
    dpigs
    xrm0 · 2009-10-26 20:38:17 0
  • change the *.avi to whatever you want to match, you can remove it altogether if you want to check all files.


    10
    find -type f -name "*.avi" -print0 | xargs -0 mplayer -vo dummy -ao dummy -identify 2>/dev/null | perl -nle '/ID_LENGTH=([0-9\.]+)/ && ($t +=$1) && printf "%02d:%02d:%02d\n",$t/3600,$t/60%60,$t%60' | tail -n 1
    syssyphus · 2009-09-24 15:50:39 4
  • Fun idea! This one adds seconds and keeps running on the same line. Perl's probably cheating though. :)


    10
    perl -e 'for(;;){@d=split("",`date +%H%M%S`);print"\r";for(0..5){printf"%.4b ",$d[$_]}sleep 1}'
    putnamhill · 2010-12-04 00:05:54 0

  • 9
    perl -e 'for(;;sleep 1){printf"\r"."%.4b "x6,split"",`date +%H%M%S`}'
    unixmonkey74668 · 2015-04-26 08:48:20 0
  • On command mode in Vim you can save parts of the current buffer in another file. * The 'n' value represents the first line of the new file. * The 'm' value represents the last line of the new file. * newfile.txt is the newfile. The results are similar to this command in perl: perl -ne 'print if n..m' in.sql > out.sql


    8
    :n,m w newfile.txt
    milmazz · 2009-03-02 19:40:34 3
  • Just want to post a Perl alternative. Does not count hidden files ('.' ones). Show Sample Output


    8
    perl -le 'print ~~ map {-s} <*>'
    MarxBro · 2012-02-21 21:09:48 0
  • This version works on Mac (avoids grep -P, adding a sed step instead, and invokes /usr/bin/perl with full path in case you have another one installed). Still requires that you install perl module HTML::Entities ? here's how: http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=640489


    7
    define(){ local y="$@";curl -sA"Opera" "http://www.google.com/search?q=define:${y// /+}"|grep -Eo '<li>[^<]+'|sed 's/^<li>//g'|nl|/usr/bin/perl -MHTML::Entities -pe 'decode_entities($_)';}
    gthb · 2010-01-30 13:08:03 1
  • This shell function grabs the weather forecast for the next 24 to 48 hours from weatherunderground.com. Replace <YOURZIPORLOCATION> with your zip code or your "city, state" or "city, country", then calling the function without any arguments returns the weather for that location. Calling the function with a zip code or place name as an argument returns the weather for that location instead of your default. To add a bit of color formatting to the output, use the following instead: weather(){ curl -s "http://api.wunderground.com/auto/wui/geo/ForecastXML/index.xml?query=${@:-<YOURZIPORLOCATION>}"|perl -ne '/<title>([^<]+)/&&printf "\x1B[0;34m%s\x1B[0m: ",$1;/<fcttext>([^<]+)/&&print $1,"\n"';} Requires: perl, curl Show Sample Output


    7
    weather(){ curl -s "http://api.wunderground.com/auto/wui/geo/ForecastXML/index.xml?query=${@:-<YOURZIPORLOCATION>}"|perl -ne '/<title>([^<]+)/&&printf "%s: ",$1;/<fcttext>([^<]+)/&&print $1,"\n"';}
    eightmillion · 2010-02-10 01:23:39 8
  • Converts reserved characters in a URI to their percent encoded counterparts. Alternate python version: echo "$url" | python -c 'import sys,urllib;print urllib.quote(sys.stdin.read().strip())' Show Sample Output


    7
    echo "$url" | perl -MURI::Escape -ne 'chomp;print uri_escape($_),"\n"'
    eightmillion · 2010-02-13 00:44:48 0
  • Using perl you can search for patterns spanning several lines, a thing that grep can't do. Append the list of files to above command or pipe a file through it, just as with regular grep. If you add the 's' modifier to the regex, the dot '.' also matches line endings, useful if you don't known how many lines you need are between parts of your pattern. Change '*' to '*?' to make it greedy, that is match only as few characters as possible. See also http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1764/display-a-block-of-text-with-awk to do a similar thing with awk. Edit: The undef has to be put in a begin-block, or a match in the first line would not be found.


    7
    perl -ne 'BEGIN{undef $/}; print "$ARGV\t$.\t$1\n" if m/(first line.*\n.*second line)/mg'
    hfs · 2010-03-18 15:46:10 1
  • Finds all directories containing more than 99MB of files, and prints them in human readable format. The directories sizes do not include their subdirectories, so it is very useful for finding any single directory with a lot of large files. Show Sample Output


    6
    du -hS / | perl -ne '(m/\d{3,}M\s+\S/ || m/G\s+\S/) && print'
    Alioth · 2009-03-25 18:06:53 1
  • Place the regular expression you want to validate between the forward slashes in the eval block. Show Sample Output


    5
    perl -we 'my $regex = eval {qr/.*/}; die "$@" if $@;'
    tlacuache · 2009-10-13 21:50:47 1

  • 5
    perl -pe 's/%([0-9a-f]{2})/sprintf("%s", pack("H2",$1))/eig'
    putnamhill · 2009-11-25 14:32:50 1
  • Prerequisites: module Pod::Webserver installed. You can install it typing: sudo perl -MCPAN -e 'install Pod::Webserver' You can replace elinks with your fav browser. For FF: podwebserver& sleep 2; firefox -remote 'openurl( http://127.0.0.1:8020/, new-tab )' If you have Firefox open, this will pop-up the index web in a new tab.


    5
    podwebserver& sleep 2; elinks 'http://127.0.0.1:8020'
    vlan7 · 2010-01-27 10:57:34 4
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