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Monitor the queries being run by MySQL

Fetch all GPG keys that are currently missing in your keyring
For instance, if people have signed your key, this will fetch the signers' keys.

small CPU benchmark with PI, bc and time.
$ # 4 cores with 2500 pi digits $ CPUBENCH 4 2500 $. $ every core will use 100% cpu and you can see how fast they calculate it. $ if you do 50000 digitits and more it can take hours or days

Record camera's output to a avi file
video.avi is the resulting file. Press Ctrl+c to stop the recording. You can change the OVC option to another to record into a different format.

show the real times iso of epochs for a given column
When you have one of those (log)files that only has epoch for time (since no one will ever look at them as a date) this is a way to get the human readable date/time and do further inspection. Mostly perl-fu :-/

Command line progress bar
This command tar?s up a directory and sends the output to gzip, showing a rate of 223MB/s. This may require you installing the pv command. For debian based users out there: $ sudo aptitude install pv

Show the date of easter
ncal -e shows the date of Easter this year. ncal -e YYYY shows the date of Easter in a given year. ncal -o works the same way, but for Orthodox dates.

Who invoked me? / Get parent command
Get the name of the parent command. This might be helpful, if you need to react on that information. E. g. a script called directly via ssh has got sshd as parent, manually invoked the parent process will probably be bash

List all files/folders in working directory with their total size in Megabytes

Use bash history with process substitution
Bash has a great history system of its commands accessed by the ! built-in history expansion operator (documented elsewhere on this site or on the web). You can combine the ! operator inside the process redirection


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