Commands by brunost (1)

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Rename files in batch

Simple Video Surveillance by email
This takes a picture (with the web cam) every 5 minutes, and send the picture to your e-mail. Some systems support mail -a "References: " so that all video surveillance emails are grouped in a single email thread. To keep your inbox clean, it is still possible to filter and move to trash video surveillance emails (and restore these emails only if you really get robbed!) For instance with Gmail, emails sent to [email protected] can be filtered with "Matches: DeliveredTo:[email protected]"

Console clock
Shows a simple clock in the console -t param removes the watch header Ctrl-c to exit

C function manual

Read the output of a command into the buffer in vim
This will append the output of "command" to whatever file you're currently editing in vim. Who else has good vim tricks? :)

Hide the name of a process listed in the `ps` output
$ exec -a $NAME $COMMAND $ARGS `your_cmd -erase_all_files` is the real process, but harmless-looking getty appears in the process table. Never actually had a need to do this, but interesting nonetheless... Tested in bash, dash. $ -a $NAME "pass NAME as the zeroth argument to COMMAND", i.e. customise the name of the process (as commonly seen with `ps`)

Download streaming video in mms
require mimms package

flush memcached via netcat

quick copy
Utilizes shell expansion of {} to give the original filename and a new filename as arguments to `cp`. Can easily be extended to make multiple copies.

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.


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