lsof -c <process name> -r

Monitoring file handles used by a particular process

-r : repeat mode

4
By: frank514
2010-10-13 20:16:51

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    lsof +L1
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What Others Think

All this shows me is a row of ======= ======= continuously.
Habitual · 396 weeks and 6 days ago
Habitual, I reckon the -c argument is not picking up the command name you are passing to it. Try: $ lsof -t -c commandname It should return a PID, if not then recheck your command name. Note case sensitivity is import.
zlemini · 396 weeks and 5 days ago
Well, stupid me, as usual didn't READ the post. lsof -c 21029 -r vs lsof -c skype -r Thanks for the assist! :)
Habitual · 396 weeks and 5 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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