Commands by postrational (5)

  • Use this BASH trick to create a variable containing the TAB character and pass it as the argument to sort, join, cut and other commands which don't understand the \t notation. sort -t $'\t' ... join -t $'\t' ... cut -d $'\t' ... Show Sample Output


    5
    sort -t $'\t' -k 2 input.txt
    postrational · 2010-07-11 12:58:51 0
  • There is a common command for outputting a field or list of fields from each line in a file. Why wouldn't you just use cut?


    4
    cut -f 1 three-column.txt > first-column.txt
    postrational · 2010-07-11 10:13:45 1
  • Performs a reverse DNS lookup, variants include: nslookup 74.125.45.100 or: host 74.125.45.100 Show Sample Output


    4
    dig -x 74.125.45.100
    postrational · 2009-09-28 15:13:34 0
  • Date-time format: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS Show Sample Output


    7
    export HISTTIMEFORMAT='%F %T '
    postrational · 2009-09-26 17:13:23 0
  • Checks the Gmail ATOM feed for your account, parses it and outputs a list of unread messages. For some reason sed gets stuck on OS X, so here's a Perl version for the Mac: curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | perl -pe 's/^<title>(.*)<\/title>.*<name>(.*)<\/name>.*$/$2 - $1/' If you want to see the name of the last person, who added a message to the conversation, change the greediness of the operators like this: curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | perl -pe 's/^<title>(.*)<\/title>.*?<name>(.*?)<\/name>.*$/$2 - $1/' Show Sample Output


    46
    curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | sed -n "s/<title>\(.*\)<\/title.*name>\(.*\)<\/name>.*/\2 - \1/p"
    postrational · 2009-09-07 21:56:40 6

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Encrypt every file in the current directory with 256-bit AES, retaining the original.
The password is stored in the password file, which obviously must be kept secure, encrypted later with gpg, deleted, or whatever you prefer. To decrypt: $ openssl enc -d -aes-256-cbc -salt -in filename.enc -out filename -pass file:/path/to/password-file Alternative ciphers can be used, of course.

run command on a group of nodes

seq (argc=2) for FreeBSD

Make changes in .bashrc immediately available
Any changes to BASH shell made in .bashrc will be active in the current terminal window from the moment you execute this command, ie. aliases, prompt settings etc. No need to restart terminal. (In BASH 'source' simile to 'eval' lets you generally execute any bunch of commands stacked in a text file).

Create a list of binary numbers
If you should happen to find yourself needing some binary numbers, this is a quickie way of doing it. If you need more digits, just add more "{0..1}" sequences for each digit you need. You can assign them to an array, too, and access them by their decimal equivalent for a quickie binary to decimal conversion (for larger values it's probably better to use another method). Note: this works in bash, ksh and zsh. For zsh, though, you'll need to issue a setopt KSH_ARRAYS to make the array zero-based. $ binary=({0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1}) $ echo ${binary[9]}

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Google Translate
$ translate [output-language] [source-language] 1) "some phrase" should be in quotes 2) [output-language] - optional (default: English) 3) [source-language] - optional (default: auto) $ translate "bonjour petit lapin" hello little rabbit $ translate "bonjour petit lapin" en hello little rabbit $ translate "bonjour petit lapin" en fr hello little rabbit

Find the package that installed a command

Rename files in batch

Get the Volume labels all bitlocker volumes had before being encrypted
Get information of volume labels of bitlocker volumes, even if they are encrypted and locked (no access to filesystem, no password provided). Note that the volume labels can have spaces, but only if you name then before encryption. Renaming a bitlocker partition after being encrypted does not have the same effect as doing it before.


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