Commands by vlan7 (12)

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Benchmark SQL Query
Benchmark a SQL query against MySQL Server. The example runs the query 10 times, and you get the average runtime in the output. To ensure that the query does not get cached, use `RESET QUERY CACHE;` on top in the query file.

Tells the shell you are using

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

Database size
Mysql command to list the disk usage of the database

Use last argument of last command
Bash shortcut to work with the last argument of your last command

Pretty Print a simple csv in the command line
Will handle pretty much all types of CSV Files. The ^M character is typed on the command line using Ctrl-V Ctrl-M and can be replaced with any character that does not appear inside the CSV. Tips for simpler CSV files: * If newlines are not placed within a csv cell then you can replace `map(repr, r)` with r

Countdown Clock
Countdown clock - Counts down from $MIN minutes to zero. I let the date command do the maths. This version doesn't use seq.

Save an HTML page, and covert it to a .pdf file
Uses htmldoc to perform the conversion

Inverted cowsay
It's quite fun to invert text using "flip.pl" (ref: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2078323 ). Slightly more challenging is to flip a whole "cowsay". :-)

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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