Commands using mount (66)

  • Particularly useful if you're mounting different drives, using the following command will allow you to see all the filesystems currently mounted on your computer and their respective specs with the added benefit of nice formatting. Show Sample Output


    307
    mount | column -t
    thechile · 2009-03-20 14:18:56 8
  • Makes a partition in ram which is useful if you need a temporary working space as read/write access is fast. Be aware that anything saved in this partition will be gone after your computer is turned off.


    192
    mount -t tmpfs tmpfs /mnt -o size=1024m
    ajrobinson · 2009-02-06 00:33:08 8
  • "-o loop" lets you use a file as a block device


    45
    mount /path/to/file.iso /mnt/cdrom -oloop
    nerd65536 · 2009-02-05 17:28:06 3
  • In my example, the mount point is /media/mpdr1 and the FS is /dev/sdd1 /mountpoint-path = /media/mpdr1 filesystem=/dev/sdd1 Why this command ? Well, in fact, with some external devices I used to face some issues : during data transfer from the device to the internal drive, some errors occurred and the device was unmounted and remounted again in a different folder. In such situations, the command mountpoint gave a positive result even if the FS wasn't properly mounted, that's why I added the df part. And if the device is not properly mounted, the command tries to unmount, to create the folder (if it exists already it will also work) and finally mount the FS on the given mount point. Show Sample Output


    20
    (mountpoint -q "/media/mpdr1" && df /media/mpdr1/* > /dev/null 2>&1) || ((sudo umount "/media/mpdr1" > /dev/null 2>&1 || true) && (sudo mkdir "/media/mpdr1" > /dev/null 2>&1 || true) && sudo mount "/dev/sdd1" "/media/mpdr1")
    tweet78 · 2014-04-12 11:23:21 3

  • 18
    mount -t ntfs-3g -o ro,loop,uid=user,gid=group,umask=0007,fmask=0117,offset=0x$(hd -n 1000000 image.vdi | grep "eb 52 90 4e 54 46 53" | cut -c 1-8) image.vdi /mnt/vdi-ntfs
    Cowboy · 2009-08-23 17:25:07 3
  • This does not require you to know the partition offset, kpartx will find all partitions in the image and create loopback devices for them automatically. This works for all types of images (dd of hard drives, img, etc) not just vmkd. You can also activate LVM volumes in the image by running vgchange -a y and then you can mount the LV inside the image. To unmount the image, umount the partition/LV, deactivate the VG for the image vgchange -a n <volume_group> then run kpartx -dv <image-flad.vmdk> to remove the partition mappings. Show Sample Output


    13
    kpartx -av <image-flat.vmdk>; mount -o /dev/mapper/loop0p1 /mnt/vmdk
    rldleblanc · 2014-09-25 23:05:09 0
  • Suppose you made a backup of your hard disk with dd: dd if=/dev/sda of=/mnt/disk/backup.img This command enables you to mount a partition from inside this image, so you can access your files directly. Substitute PARTITION=1 with the number of the partition you want to mount (returned from sfdisk -d yourfile.img). Show Sample Output


    8
    INFILE=/path/to/your/backup.img; MOUNTPT=/mnt/foo; PARTITION=1; mount "$INFILE" "$MOUNTPT" -o loop,offset=$[ `/sbin/sfdisk -d "$INFILE" | grep "start=" | head -n $PARTITION | tail -n1 | sed 's/.*start=[ ]*//' | sed 's/,.*//'` * 512 ]
    Alanceil · 2009-03-06 21:29:13 3
  • Based on the execute with timeout command in this site. A more complex script: #!/bin/sh # This script will check the avaliability of a list of NFS mount point, # forcing a remount of those that do not respond in 5 seconds. # # It basically does this: # NFSPATH=/mountpoint TIMEOUT=5; perl -e "alarm $TIMEOUT; exec @ARGV" "test -d $NFSPATH" || (umount -fl $NFSPATH; mount $NFSPATH) # TIMEOUT=5 SCRIPT_NAME=$(basename $0) for i in $@; do echo "Checking $i..." if ! perl -e "alarm $TIMEOUT; exec @ARGV" "test -d $i" > /dev/null 2>&1; then echo "$SCRIPT_NAME: $i is failing with retcode $?."1>&2 echo "$SCRIPT_NAME: Submmiting umount -fl $i" 1>&2 umount -fl $i; echo "$SCRIPT_NAME: Submmiting mount $i" 1>&2 mount $i; fi done


    8
    NFSPATH=/mountpoint TIMEOUT=5; perl -e "alarm $TIMEOUT; exec @ARGV" "test -d $NFSPATH" || (umount -fl $NFSPATH; mount $NFSPATH)
    keymon · 2010-06-04 07:59:00 0
  • Tested with NTFS and found on this site: http://forensicir.blogspot.com/2008/01/virtualbox-and-forensics-tools.html The first 32256 bytes is the MBR


    7
    vditool COPYDD my.vdi my.dd ; sudo mount -t ntfs -o ro,noatime,noexex,loop,offset=32256 my.dd ./my_dir
    Cowboy · 2009-08-14 21:33:43 0

  • 7
    sudo mount -t cifs -o user,username="samba username" //$ip_or_host/$sharename /mnt
    ludogomez · 2009-11-23 15:26:23 1
  • mounts an ISO file to a directory on the target file system


    6
    mount -o loop -t iso9660 my.iso /mnt/something
    kanzure · 2009-12-30 18:49:30 1
  • This is just a proof of concept: A FILE WHICH CAN AUTOMOUNT ITSELF through a SIMPLY ENCODED script. It takes advantage of the OFFSET option of mount, and uses it as a password (see that 9191? just change it to something similar, around 9k). It works fine, mounts, gets modified, updated, and can be moved by just copying it. USAGE: SEE SAMPLE OUTPUT The file is composed of three parts: a) The legible script (about 242 bytes) b) A random text fill to reach the OFFSET size (equals PASSWORD minus 242) c) The actual filesystem Logically, (a)+(b) = PASSWORD, that means OFFSET, and mount uses that option. PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS NOT AN ENCRYPTED FILESYSTEM. To improve it, it can be mounted with a better encryption script and used with encfs or cryptfs. The idea was just to test the concept... with one line :) It applies the original idea of http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/7382/command-for-john-cons for encrypting the file. The embedded bash script can be grown, of course, and the offset recalculation goes fine. I have my own version with bash --init-file to startup a bashrc with a well-defined environment, aliases, variables. Show Sample Output


    6
    dd if=/dev/zero of=T bs=1024 count=10240;mkfs.ext3 -q T;E=$(echo 'read O;mount -o loop,offset=$O F /mnt;'|base64|tr -d '\n');echo "E=\$(echo $E|base64 -d);eval \$E;exit;">F;cat <(dd if=/dev/zero bs=$(echo 9191-$(stat -c%s F)|bc) count=1) <(cat T;rm T)>>F
    rodolfoap · 2013-01-31 01:38:30 5
  • Run this in / in a chroot to get your own proc there.


    5
    mount -t proc{,,}
    alexfoo · 2009-02-26 12:53:58 0
  • Saved my day, when my harddrive got stuck in read-only mode.


    5
    sudo mount -o remount,rw /
    blindgaenger · 2009-03-01 13:36:05 1
  • Packages: gmailfs fuse-utils libfuse2 gvfs-fuse Config files: /etc/gmailfs/gmailfs.conf; ~/.gmailfs.conf (make a copy from the another one) Unmount: fusermount -u /mount/path/ /etc/fstab (Optional): none /mount/path/ gmailfs noauto,user[,username=USERNAME,password=PASSWORD,fsname=VOLUME] 0 0 NOTES: - The options between [] are optional since they already setuped on the config files. - The '-p' flag shows a prompt for the password entry. - It's necessary to add the user to the 'fuse' group. You can do that with: sudo chgrp fuse /dev/fuse and sudo usermod -a -G fuse USER - The volume name is not needed but highly recommended to avoid file corruption. Also choose a non-trivial name. - Google doesn't approve the use of Gmail account other than e-mail purposes. So, I recommend the creation of a new account for this.


    5
    mount.gmailfs none /mount/path/ [-o username=USERNAME[,password=PASSWORD][,fsname=VOLUME]] [-p]
    o6291408 · 2009-03-28 13:00:47 0
  • Assuming we have a disk image, ie. created by dd if=/dev/sda of=image.dd we can check the image's partition layout with fdisk -ul image.dd then, we substitute "x" with starting sector of the partition we want to mount. This example assumes that the disk uses 512 B sectors


    5
    mount -o loop,offset=$((512*x)) /path/to/dd/image /mount/path
    rocku · 2009-11-25 15:49:30 1

  • 5
    sudo dd if=/dev/sdc bs=4096 | pv -s `sudo mount /dev/sdc /media/sdc && du -sb /media/sdc/ |awk '{print $1}' && sudo umount /media/sdc`| sudo dd bs=4096 of=~/USB_BLACK_BACKUP.IMG
    juanmi · 2013-02-06 09:29:10 2
  • Add the functions to the .bashrc to make it work Example: First go to the iso file directory and type: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- user@box:~$ miso file.iso ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It will put you into a temporary mounting point directory (ISO_CD) and will show the files You can umount the iso file whatever the directory you are ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- user@box:~/ISO_CD$ uiso ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It wil umount the iso file and remove the temporary directory in your home


    4
    function miso () { mkdir ~/ISO_CD && sudo mount -o loop "$@" ~/ISO_CD && cd ~/ISO_CD && ls; } function uiso () { cd ~ && sudo umount ~/ISO_CD && rm -r ~/ISO_CD; }
    vududevil · 2009-02-25 03:41:35 1
  • the middle command between the ; and ; is the vi commands that insert that line into the last line of the file, the esc with the carets is literally hitting the escape key, you have to have the smbfs package installed to do it, I use it to access my iTunes music on my mac from my linux PC's with amarok so I can play the music anywhere in the house. among other things, it allows you to access the files on that share from your computer anytime you're on that network.


    4
    sudo vi /etc/fstab; Go//smb-share/gino /mnt/place smbfs defaults,username=gino,password=pass 0 0<esc>:wq; mount //smb-share/gino
    GinoMan2440 · 2009-04-02 16:04:35 3
  • Like symlinked directories, you can mount a directory at a different location. For example mounting a directory from one location in to the http root without having to make your program follow symlinks or change permissions when reading.


    4
    mount --bind /old/directory/path /new/directory/path
    dryicerx · 2009-04-19 01:44:59 1
  • if you use disk-based swap then it can defeat the purpose of this function.


    4
    ram() { for i in /tmp /altroot;do mount -t tmpfs tmpfs $i;done&& for i in /var /root /etc $HOME; do find -d $i |cpio -pdmv /tmp&& mount -t tmpfs tmpfs $i&& mv -v /tmp$i/* $i&& rm -vrf /tmp$i ; done ;} usage: (in rc sequence) ram
    argv · 2010-08-31 08:25:55 0

  • 4
    losetup /dev/loop0 harddrive.img; kpartx -a -v /dev/loop0; mount /dev/mapper/loop0p1 /mountpoint/
    oernii3 · 2010-10-30 11:52:11 3
  • Will append lines to the hosts file to do some basic ad blocking.


    4
    sudo mount -o remount,rw / && sudo cp /etc/hosts /etc/hosts.old && wget http://winhelp2002.mvps.org/hosts.txt && cp /etc/hosts ~/ && cat hosts.txt >> hosts && sudo cp hosts /etc/hosts
    bugmenot · 2016-06-06 15:01:19 1
  • The command is useful when, e.g., booting an existing system with a rescue or installation CD where you need to chroot into the hard-disk and be able to do stuff which accesses kernel info (e.g. when installing Ubuntu desktop with LVM2 you need to mount and chroot the hard disk from a shell window in order to install packages and run initramfs inside chroot). The command assumes that /mnt/xxx is where the chroot'ed environment's root file system on the hard disk is mounted.


    3
    for i in sys dev proc; do sudo mount --bind /$i /mnt/xxx/$i; done
    amosshapira · 2009-04-20 16:52:14 1
  • First look into /etc/modules if you have unionfs (or squashfs) support. If not, add the modules. UnionFS combines two filesystems. If there is a need to write a file, /tmp/unioncache will be used to write files (first create that directory). Reads will be done where the file is found first. http://tldp.org/HOWTO/SquashFS-HOWTO/creatingandusing.html


    3
    mount -t unionfs -o dirs=/tmp/unioncache=rw:/mnt/readonly=ro unionfs /mnt/unionfs
    Cowboy · 2009-08-23 14:16:13 0
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