Commands by ajrobinson (2)

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Route outbound SMTP connections through a addtional IP address rather than your primary

Adequately order the page numbers to print a booklet
Useful if you don't have at hand the ability to automatically create a booklet, but still want to. F is the number of pages to print. It *must* be a multiple of 4; append extra blank pages if needed. In evince, these are the steps to print it, adapted from https://help.gnome.org/users/evince/stable/duplex-npage.html.en : 1) Click File ▸ Print. 2) Choose the General tab. Under Range, choose Pages. Type the numbers of the pages in this order (this is what this one-liner does for you): n, 1, 2, n-1, n-2, 3, 4, n-3, n-4, 5, 6, n-5, n-6, 7, 8, n-7, n-8, 9, 10, n-9, n-10, 11, 12, n-11... ...until you have typed n-number of pages. 3) Choose the Page Setup tab. - Assuming a duplex printer: Under Layout, in the Two-side menu, select Short Edge (Flip). - If you can only print on one side, you have to print twice, one for the odd pages and one for the even pages. In the Pages per side option, select 2. In the Page ordering menu, select Left to right. 4) Click Print.

print first n characters of any file in human readble form using hexdump
Usefull to determine unknown file type

run command on a group of nodes in parallel

Batch Convert SVG to PNG (in parallel)
Convert some SVG files into PNG using ImageMagick's convert command. Run the conversions in parallel to save time. This is safer than robinro's forkbomb approach :-) xargs runs four processes at a time -P4

for all who don't have the watch command
#Usage: watch timeinsecond "command"

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

show rpm packages scriptlets

Signals list by NUMBER and NAME
This command seems to achieve the similar/same goal.


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