Commands tagged iso (11)

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clear all non-ascii chars of file.txt

Use curl with a local SOCKS5 proxy (e.g. Tor)
Routes curl input through a local SOCKS5 proxy; in this case, anonymizes curl activity via The Onion Router (Tor) proxy running locally. Note that the traffic will be anonymized, but it will NOT be encrypted, so your traffic will be very vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attacks.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Make sudo forget password instantly
By default sudo 'remembers' password for a few minutes, so that you do not need to re-enter password for a series of sudo commands that might follow within a short time duration. However, sometime you might want sudo to instantly 'forget' the password. (Next sudo command will need you to reenter the password) Credit: I first learned this while listening to one of the 'tuxradar' podcast.

Rename files in batch

rsync Command that limits bandwidth
Useful for transferring large file over a network during operational hours

Find files that are older than x days
Find files that are older than x days in the working directory and list them. This will recurse all the sub-directories inside the working directory. By changing the value for -mtime, you can adjust the time and by replacing the ls command with, say, rm, you can remove those files if you wish to.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

send tweets to twitter (and get user details)
great for outputting tweets from cron jobs and batch scripts

Numeric zero padding file rename
This uses Perl's rename utility (you may have to call it as prename on your box) and won't choke on spaces or other characters in filenames. It will also zero pad a number even in filenames like "vacation-4.jpg".


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