Commands tagged qemu (3)

  • Converts a .vdi file to a .vmdk file for use in a vmware virtual machine. The benefit: using this method actually works. There are others out there that claim to give you a working .vmdk by simply using the qemu-img command alone. Doing that only results in pain for you because the .vmdk file will be created with no errors, but it won't boot either. Be advised that these conversions are very disk-intensive by nature; you are probably dealing with disk images several gigabytes in size. Once finished, the process of using the new .vmdk file is left as an exercise to the reader. Show Sample Output


    9
    VBoxManage internalcommands converttoraw winxp.vdi winxp.raw && qemu-img convert -O vmdk winxp.raw winxp.vmdk && rm winxp.raw
    linuxrawkstar · 2009-10-12 16:23:37 0
  • Unlock your VMS to avoid problems after some failed tasks ended. Show Sample Output


    1
    for i in $(qm list | awk '{ print $1 }' | grep -v VMID); do echo "Unlocking:" $i; qm unlock $i; echo "Unlocked"; done
    arkalira · 2018-09-13 08:35:12 0
  • This is based on the Windows Version of VirtualBox. From the /? ... VBoxManage clonehd | [--format VDI|VMDK|VHD|RAW|] [--variant Standard,Fixed,Split2G,Stream,ESX] [--type normal|writethrough|immutable|shareable] [--remember] [--existing] From the online help.. http://www.virtualbox.org/manual/ch08.html#id2676537 VBoxManage clonehd This command duplicates a registered virtual hard disk image to a new image file with a new unique identifier (UUID). The new image can be transferred to another host system or imported into VirtualBox again using the Virtual Media Manager; see the section called ?The Virtual Media Manager? and the section called ?Cloning disk images?. The syntax is as follows: VBoxManage clonehd | [--format VDI|VMDK|VHD|RAW|] [--variant Standard,Fixed,Split2G,Stream,ESX] [--type normal|writethrough|immutable] [--remember] where the parameters mean: format Allow to choose a file format for the output file different from the file format of the input file. variant Allow to choose a file format variant for the output file. It is a comma-separated list of variant flags. Not all combinations are supported, and specifying inconsistent flags will result in an error message. type Only honored if --remember is also specified. Defines what kind of hard disk type this image should be. remember Keep the destination image registered after it was successfully written. Show Sample Output


    -4
    vboxmanage clonehd --format VMDK <source image|uuid> <destination image>
    dreffed · 2010-10-04 16:42:12 0

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