Commands by michauko (2)

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Identify long lines in a file
This command displays a list of lines that are longer than 72 characters. I use this command to identify those lines in my scripts and cut them short the way I like it.

geoip information
That makes a function you can put in your ~/.bashrc to run it when you need in any term with an IP as argument

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

the executable that started the currently running oracle databases and the ORACLE_HOME relative to each
get a list of currently running oracle dbs (identified by the pmon process) show the executable that spawned the process and show the ORACLE_HOME relative to the environment within which the process is running tailored to AIX (sed on linux behaves...differently) suggestions for a better way...please.

Remove security limitations from PDF documents using ghostscript
Remove security from PDF document using this very simple command on Linux and OSX. You need ghostscript for this baby to work.

Search for a word in less
Although less behaves more or less like vim in certain aspects, the vim regex for word boundaries (\< and \>) do not work in less. Instead, use \b to denote a word boundary. Therefore, if you want to search for, say, the word "exit", but do not want to search for exiting, exits, etc., then surround "exit" with \b. This is useful if you need to search for specific occurrences of a keyword or command. \b can also be used at just the beginning and end, if needed.

worse alternative to
worse alternative to ctrl+r: grep the history removing duplicates without sorting (case insensitive search).

Find the package that installed a command

Most simple way to get a list of open ports

dmesg with colored human-readable dates
Use sed to color the output of a human-readable dmesg output


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