Commands by o0110o (19)

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Open a Remote Desktop (RDP) session with a custom resolution.
Using a widescreen monitor, I often get annoyed that the RDP window is too high, or too narrow for what I want to display. In this example, I'm on a 1680 x 1050 display.

camelcase to underscore
Convert a camelCase string into snake_case. To complement senorpedro's command.

Cleanup firefox's database.
Sqlite database keeps collecting cruft as time passes, which can be cleaned by the 'vacuum;' command. This command cleans up the cruft in all sqlite files relating to the user you have logged in as. This command has to be run when firefox is not running, or it will exit displaying the pid of the firefox running.

Rename files in batch

Remove job from crontab by commandline
The "-u USER" is optional if root user is used

rgrep: recursive grep without .svn
Only excludes .svn from filenames.

Replace duplicate files by hardlinks

Adding formatting to an xml document for easier reading
Sometimes you're trying to read through an xml file to determine whats wrong with it and a tool had removed all the linebreaks. xmllint will go ahead and make it pretty for you.

reverse-i-search: Search through your command line history
"What it actually shows is going to be dependent on the commands you've previously entered. When you do this, bash looks for the last command that you entered that contains the substring "ls", in my case that was "lsof ...". If the command that bash finds is what you're looking for, just hit Enter to execute it. You can also edit the command to suit your current needs before executing it (use the left and right arrow keys to move through it). If you're looking for a different command, hit Ctrl+R again to find a matching command further back in the command history. You can also continue to type a longer substring to refine the search, since searching is incremental. Note that the substring you enter is searched for throughout the command, not just at the beginning of the command." - http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/using-bash-history-more-efficiently

colorize sequences of digits
Credits go to Flatcap https://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/by/flatcap


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