Commands tagged video (74)

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Automatically rename tmux window using the current working directory
Adds a function that runs every time the prompt is rendered. The function grabs the CWD from PWD and issues a command to tmux to change the current window

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Go to the previous sibling directory in alphabetical order
Based on linkinpark342 suggestion. Sometimes you have to browse your way through a lot of sub-directories. This command cd to the previous sub-directory in alphabetical order. For example, if you have the directories "lectures/01-intro", "lectures/02-basic", "lectures/03-advanced" and so on, and your PWD is "02-basic", it jumps to "01-intro".

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Produces a list of when your domains expire
Create a text file called domainlist.txt with a domain per line, then run the command above. All registries are a little different, so play around with the command. Should produce a list of domains and their expirations date. I am responsible for my companies domains and have a dozen or so myself, so this is a quick check if I overlooked any.

List known debian vulnerabilities on your system -- many of which may not yet be patched.
You can search for CVEs at https://security-tracker.debian.org/tracker/ or use --report to get full links. This can be added to cron, but unless you're going to do manual patches, you'd just be torturing yourself.

execute your commands hiding secret bits from history records
$ wget --user=username --password="$password" http://example.org/ Instead of hiding commands entirely from history, I prefer to use "read" to put the password into a variable, and then use that variable in the commands instead of the password. Without the "-e" and "-s" it should work in any bourne-type shell, but the -s is what makes sure the password doesn't get echoed to the screen at all. (-e makes editing work a bit better)

continuously print string as if being entered from the keyboard
Cycles continuously through a string printing each character with a random delay less than 1 second. First parameter is min, 2nd is max. Example: 1 3 means sleep random .1 to .3. Experiment with different values. The 3rd parameter is the string. The sleep will help with battery life/power consumption. $ cycle 1 3 $(openssl rand 100 | xxd -p) Fans of "The Shining" might get a kick out of this: $ cycle 1 4 ' All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.'

Play ISO/DVD-files and activate dvd-menu and mouse menu clicks.

Get Futurama quotations from slashdot.org servers
slashdot.org webserver adds an X-Bender or X-Fry HTTP header to every response!


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