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Change attributes of files so you can edit them
I had problems in Ubuntu while trying to edit /etc/resolv.conf, even with sudo I couldn't make any change. After a 2 minutes search on google I found this command. Hope someone finds it useful. It works like chmod, with + and - to denote which attributes are being added and which are being removed. See other attributes on man pages or on wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chattr

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Watch active calls on an Asterisk PBX
Only the number of calls nothing else.

processes per user counter
use Linux ;)

truncate deleted files from lsof
While the posted solution works, I'm a bit uneasy about the "%d" part. This would be hyper-correct approach: $ lsof|gawk '$4~/txt/{next};/REG.*\(deleted\)$/{sub(/.$/,"",$4);printf ">/proc/%s/fd/%s\n", $2,$4}' Oh, and you gotta pipe the result to sh if you want it to actually trim the files. ;) Btw, this approach also removes false negatives (OP's command skips any deleted files with "txt" in their name).

Setting global redirection of STDERR to STDOUT in a script
You have a script where =ALL= STDERR should be redirected to STDIN and you don't want to add "2>&1" at the end of each command... E.G.: $ ls -al /foo/bar 2>&1 Than just add this piece of code at the beginning of your script! I hope this can help someone. :)

finding cr-lf files aka dos files with ^M characters
Looking for carriage returns would also identify files with legacy mac line endings. To fix both types: $ perl -i -pe 's/\r\n?/\n/g' $(find . -type f -exec fgrep -l $'\r' "{}" \;)

Turn shell tracing and verbosity (set -xv) on/off with 1 command!
Running this command turns shell tracing and shell verbose debugging on or off. Not only does it do that, it also uses your terminals builtin method of setting colors to make debugging much easier. It looks at the current shell options contained in the $- special bash variable and that lets this function set the opposite of the current value. So from the shell you could do a: $ setx; echo "y" | ( cat -t ) | echo "d"; setx and it will turn on debbuggin. This is an amazingly useful function that is perfect to add system-wide by adding it to /etc/profile or /etc/bashrc.. You can run it from the shell, and you can also use it in your shell scripts like my .bash_profile - http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Resume scp of a big file

resize all JPG images in folder and create new images (w/o overwriting)
Convert all jpegs in the current directory into ~1024*768 pixels and ~ 150 KBytes jpegs


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