Commands tagged parallel (39)

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Tail a log-file over the network
This one is tried and tested for Ubuntu 12.04. Works great for tailing any file over http.

list files recursively by size

convert a web page into a pdf
This uses the "command-line print" plugin for Firefox (http://torisugari.googlepages.com/commandlineprint2). This same plugin can also produce PNGs. On *nix, the file must exist; therefore the touch bit in front. Also, firefox seems to ignore saved user preferences when "printing" this way (margins, header, footer, etc.), so I had to tweak my ~/.mozilla/firefox/xxxxxxxx.default/prefs.js file by hand. Yup, that's *prefs.js* not user.js - apparently, firefox ignores my user.js file too...

Spell check the text in clipboard (paste the corrected clipboard if you like)
xclip -o > /tmp/spell.tmp # Copy clipboard contents to a temp file aspell check /tmp/spell.tmp # Run aspell on that file cat /tmp/spell.tmp | xclip # Copy the results back to the clipboard, so that you can paste the corrected text I'm not sure xclip is installed in most distributions. If not, you can install x11-apps package

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).

interactive rss-based colorful commandline-fu reader perl oneliner (v0.1)
required packages: curl, xml2, html2text command is truncated, see 'sample output'

Copy all files. All normal files, all hidden files and all files starting with - (minus).
./* is for copying files starting with - .[!.]* is for copying hidden files and avoiding copying files from the parent directory. ..?* is for copying files starting with .. (avoids the directory ..) /path/to/dir the path to the directory where the files should be copied Can also be used as a script. Input argument is /path/to/dir in tcsh, replace .[!.]* with .[^.]*

Show whats going on restoring files from a spectrum protect backup
spectrum protect's dsmc command shows file names and total amount of restore. This command shows which files are actually open and their siz in GB and highlights the change to the previous output

Like top but for files
Like top, but for files


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