Commands tagged parallel (39)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Change a specific value in a path
Awk replaces the value of a specific field while retaining the field separator "/" .

get partitions that are over 50% usage

Delete backward from cursor, useful when you enter the wrong password

echo something backwards
NAME rev - reverse lines of a file or files SYNOPSIS rev [file ...] DESCRIPTION The rev utility copies the specified files to the standard output, reversing the order of characters in every line. If no files are specified, the standard input is read. AVAILABILITY The rev command is part of the util-linux-ng package and is available from ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/util-linux-ng/.

Quick HTML image gallery from folder contents with Perl
This includes a title attribute so you can see the file name by hovering over an image. Also will hoover up any image format - jpg, gif and png.

Show which process is blocking umount (Device or resource is busy)
Instead of using force un-mounting, it's better to find the processes that currently use the relevant folder. Taken from: http://www.linuxhowtos.org/Tips%20and%20Tricks/findprocesses.htm

Get video information with ffmpeg
ffprobe is specially intended to get video information

throttle bandwidth with cstream
this bzips a folder and transfers it over the network to "host" at 777k bit/s. cstream can do a lot more, have a look http://www.cons.org/cracauer/cstream.html#usage for example: $ echo w00t, i'm 733+ | cstream -b1 -t2 hehe :)

Generate diff of first 500 lines of two files
Useful for massive files where doing a full diff would take too long. This just runs diff on the first 500 lines of each. The use of subshells to feed STDIN is quite a useful construct.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: