Commands by ketil (3)

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total text files in current dir

remove hostname from known_hosts

pretend to be busy in office to enjoy a cup of coffee

all out
How to force a userid to log out of a Linux host, by killing all processes owned by the user, including login shells:

Move a folder and merge it with another folder
This will move a folder and merge it with another folder which may contain duplicates. Technically it's just creating hardlinks of everything in the folder, and after it's done, delete the source (with rm -r source/ ) to complete the move. This is much faster than, for example, using rsync to merge folders which would actually copy the entire contents and so for a lot of files would take much longer. This uses macutils gcp port of cp so it can be used on osx/MacOS. If using in linux or some unix where cp includes the ability to create links with -l you can just use cp instead of gcp.

Picture Renamer
jhead is a very nice tool to do all sorts of things with photographs, in a batch-oriented way. It has a specific function to rename files based on dates, and the format I used above was just an example.

A fun thing to do with ram is actually open it up and take a peek. This command will show you all the string (plain text) values in ram
cat? dd? RTFM

rsync...

Create a 100MB file for testing transfer speed

Commit command to history file immedeately after execution
This could be added to .bashrc. Background: Linux usually saves history only on clean exit of shell. If shell ends unclean, history is lost. Also numerous terminals might confuse their history. With this variable set, history is immedeately written, accessible to all other open shells.


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