Commands tagged image (35)

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Get the time from NIST.GOV
The format is JJJJJ YR-MO-DA HH:MM:SS TT L DUT1 msADV UTC(NIST) OTM and is explained more fully here: http://tf.nist.gov/service/acts.htm

Capitalize the first letter of every word

list files recursively by size

Get the Volume labels all bitlocker volumes had before being encrypted
Get information of volume labels of bitlocker volumes, even if they are encrypted and locked (no access to filesystem, no password provided). Note that the volume labels can have spaces, but only if you name then before encryption. Renaming a bitlocker partition after being encrypted does not have the same effect as doing it before.

find an unused unprivileged TCP port
Some commands (such as netcat) have a port option but how can you know which ports are unused?

eavesdrop
Record off the microphone on a remote computer and listen to it live through your speakers locally.

return external ip
curl inet-ip.info -> 113.33.232.62\n curl inet-ip.info/ip -> 113.33.232.62 curl inet-ip.info/json -> JSON print curl inet-ip.info/json/indent -> JSON pretty print curl inet-ip.info/yaml -> YAML format curl inet-ip.info/toml -> TOML format http://inet-ip.info

Uniquely (sort of) color text so you can see changes
Colorify colors input by converting the text to a number and then performing modulo 7 on it. This resulting number is used as the color escape code. This can be used to color the results of commands with complex outputs (like "482279054165371") so if any of the digits change, there's a good chance the color will change too. I say good chance because there's only 7 unique colors here, so assuming you were watching random numbers, there would be a 6/7 chance that the color would change when the number changed. This should really only be used to help quickly identify when things change, but should not be the only thing relied upon to positively assert that an output has not changed.

Mortality Countdown
watch the seconds of your life tick away - replace YYYY-mm-dd HH:MM:ss w/ your birthtime.

scan whole internet and specific port in humanistic time
apt-get install git gcc make libpcap-dev git clone https://github.com/robertdavidgraham/masscan cd masscan make install -pDm755 bin/masscan /usr/bin/masscan


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