Commands tagged sync (5)

  • Do not run this command if you already have ntpd running! This needs to run as root, for example with sudo: sudo ntpdate pool.ntp.org && sudo hwclock --systohc && sudo hwclock --adjust This command will fetch accurate time from NTP servers and synchronize your system clock, then it will use the system clock to synchronize your hardware clock, and will calculate the time drift. Show Sample Output


    5
    ntpdate pool.ntp.org && hwclock --systohc && hwclock --adjust
    Weboide · 2009-06-04 13:35:14 2
  • Sometimes when copying files from one place to another, the timestamps get lost. Maybe you forgot to add a flag to preserve timestamps in your copy command. You're sure the files are exactly the same in both locations, but the timestamps of the files in the new home are wrong and you need them to match the source. Using this command, you will get a shell script (/tmp/retime.sh) than you can move to the new location and just execute - it will change the timestamps on all the files and directories to their previous values. Make sure you're in the right directory when you launch it, otherwise all the touch commands will create new zero-length files with those names. Since find's output includes "." it will also change the timestamp of the current directory. Ideally rsync would be the way to handle this - since it only sends changes by default, there would be relatively little network traffic resulting. But rsync has to read the entire file contents on both sides to be sure no bytes have changed, potentially causing a huge amount of local disk I/O on each side. This could be a problem if your files are large. My approach avoids all the comparison I/O. I've seen comments that rsync with the "--size-only" and "--times" options should do this also, but it didn't seem to do what I wanted in my test. With my approach you can review/edit the output commands before running them, so you can tell exactly what will happen. The "tee" command both displays the output on the screen for your review, AND saves it to the file /tmp/retime.sh. Credit: got this idea from Stone's answer at http://serverfault.com/questions/344731/rsync-copying-over-timestamps-only?rq=1, and combined it into one line. Show Sample Output


    5
    find . -printf "touch -m -d \"%t\" '%p'\n" | tee /tmp/retime.sh
    dmmst19 · 2012-11-05 20:32:05 5
  • Find all corrupted jpeg in the current directory, find a file with the same name in a source directory hierarchy and copy it over the corrupted jpeg file. Convenient to run on a large bunch of jpeg files copied from an unsure medium. Needs the jpeginfo tool, found in the jpeginfo package (on debian at least).


    0
    for i in *jpg; do jpeginfo -c $i | grep -E "WARNING|ERROR" | cut -d " " -f 1 | xargs -I '{}' find /mnt/sourcerep -name {} -type f -print0 | xargs -0 -I '{}' cp -f {} ./ ; done
    vincentp · 2009-05-07 00:30:36 0
  • rsync will copy the source directory into destination and any subsequent run will synchronize only the changes from the source. Show Sample Output


    0
    rsync -avz ~/src ~/des/
    axelabs · 2012-06-01 15:08:12 4
  • There must be no space between -p and the password


    0
    ssh <remoteuser>@<remoteserver> \ 'mysqldump -u <user> -p<password> <database>' \ | mysql -u <user> -p<password> <database>
    kvcrawford · 2013-03-05 19:20:52 10

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Grep without having it show its own process in the results
The trick here is to use the brackets [ ] around any one of the characters of the grep string. This uses the fact that [?] is a character class of one letter and will be removed when parsed by the shell. This is useful when you want to parse the output of grep or use the return value in an if-statement without having its own process causing it to erroneously return TRUE.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Cheap iftop
Shows updated status in a terminal window for connections to port '80' in a human-friendly form. Use 'watch -n1' to update every second, and 'watch -d' to highlight changes between updates. If you wish for status updates on a port other than '80', always remember to put a space afterwards so that ":80" will not match ":8080".

create iso image from a directory
create iso image from directory . Usefull for virtualised machine To create CD ISO image of directories that contain long file name or non-8.3 format (particularly if you want to burn the CD image for use in Windows system), use the -J option switch that generates Joliet directory records in addition to regular iso9660 file names. For example, to create CD image of Vista SP1 directory: mkisofs -o VitaSP1.iso -J VistaSP1

get the latest version
to download latest version of "util", maybe insert a sort if they wont be shown in right order. curl lists all files on mirror, grep your util, tail -1 will gets the one lists on the bottom and get it with wget

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Extract .tar.lzma archive

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Get all IPs via ifconfig
Fetches the IPs and ONLY the IPs from ifconfig. Simplest, shortest, cleanest. Perl is too good to be true... (P.S.: credit should go to Peteris Krumins at catonmat.net)


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: