Commands tagged timestamp (16)

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Measure, explain and minimize a computer's electrical power consumption
Run this command as root to get enough stats. It works on AMD and Intel machines, including desktops. If ran on a laptop it'll give you suggestions on extending your battery life. You'll need to install PowerTOP if you don't have, via 'apt-get install powertop', etc. To grep the output use: sudo powertop -d | grep ... The many command suggestions PowerTOP gives you alone will increase your command-line fu!

quickly backup or copy a file with bash
This inserts timestamp instead of .bak extension.

Lists the size of certain file in every 10 seconds
watch is a command especially designed for doing this job

Turning off display
To turn off monitor: xset dpms force off To turn on, simply press a key, or move mouse/mousepad.

Binary digits Matrix effect
Silly Perl variant.

Monitor a file with tail with timestamps added
This is useful when watching a log file that does not contain timestamps itself. If the file already has content when starting the command, the first lines will have the "wrong" timestamp when the command was started and not when the lines were originally written.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Play all files in the directory using MPlayer
Skip forward and back using the < and > keys. Display the file title with I.

run command on a group of nodes in parallel

Find the package that installed a command


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