Commands by EBAH (16)

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remove files and directories with acces time older than a given date
touch a dummy file with the specified date, then use find with -anewer .

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Calculates the number of physical cores considering HyperThreading in AWK
Check whether hyperthreading is enabled or not. a better solution as nproc should work on all OS with awk

DVD to YouTube ready watermarked MPEG-4 AVI file using mencoder (step 2)
Reencodes to MPEG-4 DivX output video file from step 1. Audio stream is simply copied. Resizes to 320x240 and deinterlaces as needed. A heading subtitle file is applied as watermark. This heading subtitle file can be a URL.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Find the package that installed a command

access to last touched or created file with arrow_up_key immediately after displaying the file list
Display recursive file list (newest file displayed at the end) and be free to access last file in the list simply by pressing arrow_up_key i.e. open it with joe editor. BTW IMHO the list of files with newest files at the end is often more informative. Put this 'lsa' function somewhere in your .bashrc and issue $ . ~/.bashrc or $ source ~/.bashrc to have access to the 'lsa' command immediately. . (the function appends command "joe last_file_in_the_list" at the end of command history)

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

List processes sorted by CPU usage

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials


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