Commands tagged date (112)

  • Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale. Show Sample Output


    0
    for i in {2018..2025}-{01..12}-13; do [[ $(date --date $i +"%u" | grep 5) != 5 ]] || echo "$i Friday the 13th"; done
    test666v2 · 2018-07-10 21:31:02 0
  • Alter the years in the first brace expansion to select your year range. Modify date format to your liking but leave " %w" at the end. Show Sample Output


    0
    for i in {2018..2022}-{01..12}-13; do date --date $i +"%Y %B %w" | sed '/[^5]$/d; s/ 5*$//'; done
    justsomeguy · 2018-07-09 15:47:39 0
  • I removed the dependency of the English language Show Sample Output


    5
    for y in $(seq 1996 2018); do echo -n "$y -> "; for m in $(seq 1 12); do NDATE=$(date --date "$y-$m-13" +%w); if [ $NDATE -eq 5 ]; then PRINTME=$(date --date "$y-$m-13" +%B);echo -n "$PRINTME "; fi; done; echo; done
    ginochen · 2018-06-25 09:20:57 1
  • Simply change the years listed in the first seq, and it will print out all the months in that span of years that have Friday the 13ths in them. Show Sample Output


    1
    for y in $(seq 1996 2018); do echo -n "$y -> "; for m in $(seq 1 12); do NDATE=$(date --date "$y-$m-13" +%A); if [ $NDATE == 'Friday' ]; then PRINTME=$(date --date "$y-$m-13" +%B);echo -n "$PRINTME "; fi; done; echo; done
    suspenderguy · 2018-06-13 20:11:46 0
  • Do you ever want to know which day of week was your birhday! Now you can check that with this command, just set your birh date at the beginning (My bday in the example) and the dates will be revealed. ;) Show Sample Output


    3
    DAY=01; MONTH=07; YEAR=1979; CURRENT_YEAR=$(date +%Y); for i in $(seq $YEAR $CURRENT_YEAR); do echo -n "$i -> "; date --date "$i-$MONTH-$DAY" +%A; done
    nordri · 2018-06-08 07:56:59 1

  • 0
    echo "$(obase=16; echo "$(date +%s)" | bc | xxd -r -p | base32)"
    malathion · 2017-06-26 16:58:38 2
  • echo 'Current hour' hour=$(date +%H) if [ $hour -gt 9 -a $hour -lt 23 ]; then echo -n '*'; else echo -n '#'; fi; echo ' '$hour; echo 'Test around the clock:' for hour in {0..23} {0..23}; do if [ $hour -gt 9 -a $hour -lt 23 ]; then echo -n '*'; else echo -n '#'; fi; echo ' '$hour; done echo 'If you need to depend on UTC, just add `-u` flag to `date` command' Show Sample Output


    0
    hour=$(date +%H); if [ $hour -gt 9 -a $hour -lt 23 ]; then echo -n '*'; else echo -n '#'; fi; echo ' '$hour;
    gwpl · 2016-07-26 20:53:59 0
  • IMPORTANT: You need Windows PowerShell to run this command - in your Windows Command Prompt, type powershell Uses sajb to start a PowerShell background job that pings an IP host every 10 seconds. Any changes in the host's Up/Down state is time-stamped and logged to a file. Date/time stamps are logged in two formats: Unix and human-readable. A while(1) loop repeats the test every 10 seconds by using the sleep command. See the Sample Output for more detail. I use this command to log Up/Down events of my Motorola SB6141 cable modem (192.168.100.1). To end the logging, close the PowerShell window or use the "exit" command. Show Sample Output


    0
    sajb {$ip="192.168.100.1";$old=0;while(1){$up=test-connection -quiet -count 1 $ip;if($up-ne$old){$s=(date -u %s).split('.')[0]+' '+(date -f s).replace('T',' ')+' '+$ip+' '+$(if($up){'Up'}else{'Down'});echo $s|out-file -a $home\ping.txt;$old=$up}sleep 10}}
    omap7777 · 2015-12-28 20:33:08 0
  • display IP's that unsuccessfully attempted to login 5 or more times today may want to filter any trusted IP's and the localhost useful for obtaining a list IP addresses to block on the firewall Show Sample Output


    0
    lastb -i | grep "$(date '+%a %b %d')" | awk '{ print $3 }' | sort | uniq -c | awk '{ if ($1 >= 5) print $2; }'
    forestb · 2015-11-20 07:19:20 0
  • minimal oneliner to keep track of time Show Sample Output


    0
    read year month day hour minutes seconds epoch _ < <(date '+%Y %m %d %H %M %S %s')
    snorf · 2015-11-11 07:27:37 0
  • Print out your age in days in binary. Today's my binary birthday, I'm 2^14 days old :-) . This command does bash arithmatic $(( )) on two dates: Today: $(date +%s) Date of birth: $(date +%s -d YYYY-MM-DD) The dates are expressed as the number of seconds since the Unix epoch (Jan 1970), so we devide the difference by 86400 (seconds per day). . Finally we pipe "obase=2; DAYS-OLD" into bc to convert to binary. (obase == output base) Show Sample Output


    2
    echo "obase=2;$((($(date +%s)-$(date +%s -d YYYY-MM-DD))/86400))" | bc
    flatcap · 2015-10-19 15:40:32 0
  • Often you run a command, but afterwards you're not quite sure what it did. By adding this prefix/suffix around [COMMAND], you can list any files that were modified. . Take a nanosecond timestamp: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.NNNNNNNNN date "+%F %T.%N" . Find any files that have been modified since that timestamp: find . -newermt "$D" . This command currently only searches below the current directory. If you want to look elsewhere change the find parameter, e.g. find /var/log . -newermt "$D" Show Sample Output


    2
    D="$(date "+%F %T.%N")"; [COMMAND]; find . -newermt "$D"
    flatcap · 2015-10-15 21:09:54 2
  • A wrapper around ssh to automatically provide logging and session handling. This function runs ssh, which runs screen, which runs script. . The logs and the screen session are stored on the server. This means you can leave a session running and re-attach to it later, or from another machine. . . Requirements: * Log sessions on a remote server * Transparent - nothing extra to type * No installation - nothing to copy to the server beforehand . Features: * Function wrapper delegating to ssh - so nothing to remember - uses .ssh/config as expected - passes your command line option to ssh * Self-contained: no scripts to install on the server * Uses screen(1), so is: - detachable - re-attachable - shareable * Records session using script(1) * Configurable log file location, which may contain variables or whitespace L="$HOME" # local variable L="\$HOME" # server variable L="some space" . Limitations: * Log dir/file may not contain '~' (which would require eval on the server) . . The sessions are named by the local user connecting to the server. Therefore if you detach and re-run the same command you will reconnect to your original session. If you want to connect/share another's session simply run: USER=bob ssh root@server . The command above is stripped down to an absolute minimum. A fully expanded and annotated version is available as a Gist (git pastebin): https://gist.github.com/flatcap/3c42326abeb1197ee714 . If you want to add timing info to script, change the command to: ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script --timing=\"$L-timing\" -f \"$L\"";} Show Sample Output


    3
    ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script -f \"$L\"";}
    flatcap · 2015-10-14 13:14:29 1
  • Great for backup / restore scripts. May want to remove the %M/%S to group backups by hour. If using a script, set a variable earlier with the date command, then reference that variable. Otherwise, time will keep on rolling ;-) declare -rx script_start_time="$(date '+./%Y/%m/%d/%H/%M/%S')" mkdir -p "$script_start_time" Show Sample Output


    0
    mkdir -p "$(date '+./%Y/%m/%d/%H/%M/%S')"
    forestb · 2015-09-25 08:56:26 0
  • When run on an existing file, alters it's creation date.


    0
    touch /path/to/file
    lolssl · 2015-09-22 16:49:22 0
  • perl version of "Wait for file to stop changing" When "FileName" has not been changed for last 10 seconds, then print "DONE" "10" in "(stat)[10]" means ctime. One have other options like atime, mtime and others. http://perldoc.perl.org/functions/stat.html


    0
    echo FileName | perl -nlE'sleep 1 while time-(stat)[10]<10' && echo DONE
    pung96 · 2015-05-09 14:58:41 0
  • This loop will finish if a file hasn't changed in the last 10 seconds. . It checks the file's modification timestamp against the clock. If 10 seconds have elapsed without any change to the file, then the loop ends. . This script will give a false positive if there's a 10 second delay between updates, e.g. due to network congestion . How does it work? 'date +%s' gives the current time in seconds 'stat -c %Y' gives the file's last modification time in seconds '$(( ))' is bash's way of doing maths '[ X -lt 10 ]' tests the result is Less Than 10 otherwise sleep for 1 second and repeat . Note: Clever as this script is, inotify is smarter. Show Sample Output


    3
    while [ $(( $(date +%s) - $(stat -c %Y FILENAME) )) -lt 10 ]; do sleep 1; done; echo DONE
    flatcap · 2015-05-09 12:30:13 0
  • Return the creation date of a file on ext2, 3, 4 filesystems, because stat command won't show it. Useful on ubuntu, debian, and else Show Sample Output


    3
    debugfs -R "stat <$(stat --printf=%i filename)>" /dev/sdaX | grep crtime
    pggx999 · 2015-04-09 01:23:56 0
  • Mac have direct conversion of seconds (Epoch time) Show Sample Output


    1
    date -r 1390196676
    MacMladen · 2014-09-24 10:33:16 0
  • This function will find the modification time in unix_time of the given file, then calculate the number of minutes from now to then and then find all files modified in that range. Show Sample Output


    0
    function findOlderThan () { find . -mmin -$((($(date "+%s") - $(stat -c %Y $1))/60)) -type f ; }
    RobertDeRose · 2014-08-29 17:52:34 0
  • Calculate the date of Sysadmin day (last Friday of July) of any given year Show Sample Output


    0
    YEAR=2015; echo Jul $(ncal 7 $YEAR | awk '/^Fr/{print $NF}')
    andreasS · 2014-08-17 11:12:09 0
  • Calculate Sysadmin day of any given year using 2 `date`. Code based on http://stackoverflow.com/a/5656859/196133 Show Sample Output


    0
    YEAR=2015; date -d${YEAR}0801-$(date -d${YEAR}0801+2days +%u)days +%b\ %e
    andreasS · 2014-08-17 11:06:25 0
  • Calculate the date of Sysadmin day (last Friday of July) of any given year Show Sample Output


    0
    YEAR=2015; ncal 7 $YEAR | sed -n 's/^Fr.* \([^ ]\+\) *$/Jul \1/p'
    andreasS · 2014-08-17 11:04:02 0
  • bash brace expansion, sequence expression Show Sample Output


    1
    echo {-1..-5}days | xargs -n1 date +"%Y-%m-%d" -d
    grault · 2014-07-22 17:56:07 0
  • This can be easier to look at in ls output. Not as clean as +%Y%m%dT%H%M%S, but quicker to write. Show Sample Output


    0
    alias t__s='date "+%FT%T"'
    UncleLouie · 2014-03-06 04:37:55 0
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