Commands tagged ruby (24)

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Renames all files in the current directory such that the new file contains no space characters.
This is a better version, as it does no command piping, uses for instead of while loops, which allows for a list of files in the current working directory to be natively processed. It also uses the -v/verbose option with mv to let you know what the command is doing. While the command does exactly the same in a better way, I would modify the sed option to replace spaces with underscores instead, or dashes. Please note that you'll receive errors with this command as it tries to rename files that don't even have spaces. This is an alternative to: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/8761/renames-all-files-in-the-current-directory-such-that-the-new-file-contains-no-space-characters.

Pretty print SQL query with python in one line
You need to apt-get install python-sqlparse. This command simply formats a sql query and prints it out. It is very useful when you want to move a sql query from commandline to a shell script. Everything is done locally, so you don't need to worry about copying sql query to external websites.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Optimal way of deleting huge numbers of files
Optimal way of deleting huge numbers of files Using -delete is faster than: $ find /path/to/dir -type f -print0 | xargs -0 rm $ find /path/to/dir -type f -exec rm {} + $ find /path/to/dir -type f -exec rm \-f {} \;

Count number of files in a directory

Protect your eye
Redshift will adjust the color temperature and protects eye at night -b : will adjust the brightness

1+2-3+4-5+6-7 Series

Execute a command at a given time
This is an alternative to cron which allows a one-off task to be scheduled for a certain time.


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