Commands by imsaar (6)

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Extract multiple tar files at once in zsh
tar doesn't support wildcard for unpacking (so you can't use tar -xf *.tar) and it's shorter and simpler than for i in *.tar;do tar -xf $i;done (or even 'for i in *.tar;tar -xf $i' in case of zsh) -i says tar not to stop after first file (EOF)

Rename files in batch

send raw data (hex written)using UDP to an IP and port
Use it to send raw data to a networked device. Used to interact with relay controller board whose documentation is lost, so use wireshark to sniff the sent data and replayed using the command.

Automatically skip bad songs in your MPD playlist.
Case insensitive. Also you can pull in the songs from a blacklist, one per line - while :; do (mpc current | grep -i -f blacklist.txt && mpc next); sleep 5; done

Scan for nearby Bluetooth devices.
Scans local area for visible Bluetooth devices. Use 'hcitool inq' to discover the type of device it is. And use -i hciX option to specify the local Bluetooth device to use.

Rolling upgrades via aptitude
This has been my "sysupgrade" alias since ca. 2006, first used on Debian Sid, then Sabayon, and it still does its duty on Mint nowadays without breaking stuff.

What is my public IP address
Clean output, if used in scripts: $ GET checkip.dyndns.org|grep -o '[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}' or $ GET icanhazip.com

See the top 10 IP addresses in a web access log

Isolate file name from full path/find output
Quick method of isolating filenames from a full path using expansion. Much quicker than using "basename"

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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