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display emerge.log date in a human friendly way
gentoo only or gentoo-like linux distributions.

Backup files incremental with rsync to a NTFS-Partition
This will backup the _contents_ of /media/SOURCE to /media/TARGET where TARGET is formatted with ntfs. The --modify-window lets rsync ignore the less accurate timestamps of NTFS.

Watch active calls on an Asterisk PBX

Search some text from all files inside a directory

Simple Video Surveillance by email
This takes a picture (with the web cam) every 5 minutes, and send the picture to your e-mail. Some systems support mail -a "References: " so that all video surveillance emails are grouped in a single email thread. To keep your inbox clean, it is still possible to filter and move to trash video surveillance emails (and restore these emails only if you really get robbed!) For instance with Gmail, emails sent to me+trash@gmail.com can be filtered with "Matches: DeliveredTo:me+trash@gmail.com"

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

LIST FILENAMES OF FILES CREATED TODAY IN CURRENT DIRECTORY
This version eliminates the grep before the awk, which is always good. It works for GNU core utils and ensures that the date output of ls matches the format in the pattern match, regardless of locale, etc. On BSD-based systems, you can easily eliminate both the grep and the awk: find . -maxdepth 1 -Btime -$(date +%kh%lm) -type f

Remove annoying OS X DS_Store folders
Recursively removes all those hidden .DS_Store folders starting in current working directory.

Print process run time, average CPU usage, and maximum memory usage on exit
Bash has a built-in time command which provides less functionality than the real time command. Thus we reference /usr/bin/time directly. Since the command isn't very easy to remember you could alias it to something like "cputime" or even just "time".

Quick glance at who's been using your system recently
This command takes the output of the 'last' command, removes empty lines, gets just the first field ($USERNAME), sort the $USERNAMES in reverse order and then gives a summary count of unique matches.


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