Commands by StefanLasiewski (6)

  • This command is similar to the above, but is much simpler to remember. Sure, it's isn't as precise as the parent command, but most people aren't going to remember those --flags anyways unless you stick it into your .bashrc on every single system that you manage. Show Sample Output


    0
    info foo |less
    StefanLasiewski · 2013-09-12 16:49:08 0
  • If I type 'man something', I want it to find the manpage in the same order as my PATH. You can add something like this to your .bashrc # # Add my MacPorts, my personal utilities and my company utilities to my PATH. export PATH=$PATH:/opt/local/bin:$HOME/bin:/our_company_utils/bin/ # Now set the manpath based on the PATH, after man(1) parses man.conf # - No need to modify man.conf or manually modify MANPATH_MAP # - Works on Linux, FreeBSD & Darwin, unlike /etc/manpaths.d/ # Must unset MANPATH first. MANPATH is set on some systems automatically (Mac), # which causes manpath to ignore the values of PATH like /opt/local/bin (MacPorts). # Also MANPATH may be deprecated. See "SEARCH PATH FOR MANUAL PAGES" in man(1) unset MANPATH # manpath acts differently on Solaris, FreeBSD, MacOSX & GNU. This works everywhere. manpath >/dev/null # Note that MacOSX, FreeBSD & Linux have fancier ways to do some of this. (e.g. 'man --path' or 'man -q'), but this command is more universal and should work everywhere. Show Sample Output


    0
    unset MANPATH; manpath >/dev/null
    StefanLasiewski · 2010-07-02 19:45:27 0
  • This command will log the output of your simple cronjobs to syslog, and syslog will take it from there. Works great for monitoring scripts which only produce simple output. Advantages: * This can be used by regular users, without modifying system files like /etc/syslog.conf * Reduce cron spam to [email protected] (Please stop spaming the sysadmins) * Uses common tools like syslog (and logrotate) so that you don't need to maintain yet another krufty logfile. * Still ensures that the output is logged somewhere, for posterity. Perhaps it's stored the secure, central syslog server, for example. * Seems to work fine on Ubuntu, CentOS, FreeBSD & MacOSX Show Sample Output


    6
    */5 * * * * root /usr/local/nagios/sbin/nsca_check_disk 2>&1 |/usr/bin/logger -t nsca_check_disk
    StefanLasiewski · 2010-07-02 00:47:05 2
  • This command prints the Date (Not time) from 3 days ago (72 hours ago). This works on systems without GNU date (MacOSX , Solaris, FreeBSD). Show Sample Output


    4
    TZ=PST8PDT+72 date '+%Y_%m_%d'
    StefanLasiewski · 2010-07-02 00:29:27 6
  • I rarely need this, but I have a hard time remembering the command when I need it. Admit it. This has happened to you. Yes this is bad, and you better clean up now. Borrowed from http://thoughtsbyclayg.blogspot.com/2008/02/how-to-delete-last-command-from-bash.html Show Sample Output


    0
    alias histdel='history -d $((HISTCMD-2)) && history -d $((HISTCMD-1))'
    StefanLasiewski · 2010-07-02 00:20:44 3
  • I like man pages, and I like using `less(1)` as my pager. However, most GNU software keeps the manual in the 'GNU Texinfo' format, and I'm not a fan of the info(1) interface. Just give me less. This command will print out the info(1) pages, using the familiar interface of less! Show Sample Output


    1
    info gpg |less
    StefanLasiewski · 2010-07-01 23:44:15 2

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Create a random file of a specific size
This will create a 10 MB file named testfile.txt. Change the count parameter to change the size of the file. As one commenter pointed out, yes /dev/random can be used, but the content doesn't matter if you just need a file of a specific size for testing purposes, which is why I used /dev/zero. The file size is what matters, not the content. It's 10 MB either way. "Random" just referred to "any file - content not specific"

Rename files in batch

Multiplication table
The multiplication table for math study

Short Information about loaded kernel modules
I modify 4077 and marssi commandline to simplify it and skip an error when parsing the first line of lsmod (4077). Also, it's more concise and small now. I skip using xargs ( not required here ). This is only for GNU sed. For thoses without GNU sed, use that : $ modinfo $(lsmod | awk 'NR>1 {print $1}') | sed -e '/^dep/s/$/\n/g' -e '/^file/b' -e '/^desc/b' -e '/^dep/b' -e d

spawn shell listener service with nc

Attach screen over ssh
Directly attach a remote screen session (saves a useless parent bash process)

Compare two CSV files, discarding any repeated lines
The value for the sort command's -k argument is the column in the CSV file to sort on. In this example, it sorts on the second column. You must use some form of the sort command in order for uniq to work properly.

Throttle download speed (at speed x )
Axel --max-speed=x, -s x You can specify a speed (bytes per second) here and Axel will try to keep the average speed around this speed. Useful if you don?t want the program to suck up all of your bandwidth.

Recursive cat - concatenate files (filtered by extension) across multiple subdirectories into one file
Useful if you have to put together multiple files into one and they are scattered across subdirectories. For example: You need to combine all .sql files into one .sql file that would be sent to DBAs as a batch script. You do get a warning if you create a file by the same extension as the ones your searching for. find . -type f -name *.sql -exec cat {} > BatchFile.txt \;

Delete Mailer-Daemon messages


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